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Judging a Book by its Cover

Judging a Book by its Cover Figure 1 Book cover for Jan Gehl, Life Between Buildings (Washington, DC and London: Island Press, 2011), by Alixandra Hermanso and Macy Miller, architecture students, 2017, displayed in the Klai Juba Wald Architectural Studies Library at North Dakota State University. Photograph by the author. 2 ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE Regin Schwaen Department of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, North Dakota State Regin Schwaen University, Fargo, North Dakota regin.schwaen@ndsu.edu Keywords: book cover, In the last twenty years, a new situation has emerged: the amount of architectural theory, reviewing books scholarly text stored on servers has eclipsed that which was accumulated over the previous five thousand years, found mostly in books. When, in 2015, I was asked to teach a contemporary architecture and theory seminar to second year architecture students, I started to think about how to engage them in reading books. How do educators do so in a time saturated with new technologies, when students have what seems like unlimited access to enormous collections of information at their Volume 8/Issue 1 fingertips? How might an emerging architect comprehend and reflect pp 1–4 when selecting and reading a book, and how might this be different from DOI:10.1080/20507828. their selection, comprehension and reflection when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Judging a Book by its Cover

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (1): 4 – Jan 2, 2020

Judging a Book by its Cover

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (1): 4 – Jan 2, 2020

Abstract

Figure 1 Book cover for Jan Gehl, Life Between Buildings (Washington, DC and London: Island Press, 2011), by Alixandra Hermanso and Macy Miller, architecture students, 2017, displayed in the Klai Juba Wald Architectural Studies Library at North Dakota State University. Photograph by the author. 2 ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE Regin Schwaen Department of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, North Dakota State Regin Schwaen University, Fargo, North Dakota regin.schwaen@ndsu.edu Keywords: book cover, In the last twenty years, a new situation has emerged: the amount of architectural theory, reviewing books scholarly text stored on servers has eclipsed that which was accumulated over the previous five thousand years, found mostly in books. When, in 2015, I was asked to teach a contemporary architecture and theory seminar to second year architecture students, I started to think about how to engage them in reading books. How do educators do so in a time saturated with new technologies, when students have what seems like unlimited access to enormous collections of information at their Volume 8/Issue 1 fingertips? How might an emerging architect comprehend and reflect pp 1–4 when selecting and reading a book, and how might this be different from DOI:10.1080/20507828. their selection, comprehension and reflection when

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2020.1824850
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Figure 1 Book cover for Jan Gehl, Life Between Buildings (Washington, DC and London: Island Press, 2011), by Alixandra Hermanso and Macy Miller, architecture students, 2017, displayed in the Klai Juba Wald Architectural Studies Library at North Dakota State University. Photograph by the author. 2 ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE Regin Schwaen Department of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, North Dakota State Regin Schwaen University, Fargo, North Dakota regin.schwaen@ndsu.edu Keywords: book cover, In the last twenty years, a new situation has emerged: the amount of architectural theory, reviewing books scholarly text stored on servers has eclipsed that which was accumulated over the previous five thousand years, found mostly in books. When, in 2015, I was asked to teach a contemporary architecture and theory seminar to second year architecture students, I started to think about how to engage them in reading books. How do educators do so in a time saturated with new technologies, when students have what seems like unlimited access to enormous collections of information at their Volume 8/Issue 1 fingertips? How might an emerging architect comprehend and reflect pp 1–4 when selecting and reading a book, and how might this be different from DOI:10.1080/20507828. their selection, comprehension and reflection when

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2020

Keywords: book cover; architectural theory; reviewing books

There are no references for this article.