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Injury, illness, and medication use surveillance during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s championship: a prospective cohort study of football players from Southern Africa

Injury, illness, and medication use surveillance during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s championship: a... Background Systematic analyses of injuries, illnesses or medication use and their risk factors among female African athletes are scarce, which has implications for management of these athletes. Aim This prospective cohort study analysed the incidence and characteristics of injuries, illnesses and medication use during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s Championship. Methods The medical personnel of all participating teams reported all new injuries, illnesses and medication used by players daily. Results Sixty-three injuries were reported: 45 match and 18 training injuries; 45.5 (95% CI: 32.2 to 58.8) injuries/1000 match-hours and 21.7 (95% CI: 11.7 to 31.7) injuries/1000 training-hours, respectively. Most (n = 55, 87%) were caused by contact with another player and involved the lower extremity (n = 43; 68%). Fifty-eight illnesses were reported: 44.4 (95% CI: 33.0 to 58.8) illnesses/1000 player-days, mostly diarrhoea (n = 25; 43.1%) and dysmenorrhoea (n = 18; 31%). No cases of COVID-19 were reported. In total, 175 medications were prescribed: 168.8 (95% CI: 143.8 to 193.8) medications/1000 player-days. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n = 60; 34.3%) and analgesics (n = 33; 18.9%) were the most commonly prescribed drugs. Conclusion Incidences of injury and illnesses were high but time loss was low, likely due to high NSAIDs use. Further studies should be conducted in order to inform appropriate prevention or management protocols in this population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science and Medicine in Football Taylor & Francis

Injury, illness, and medication use surveillance during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s championship: a prospective cohort study of football players from Southern Africa

Science and Medicine in Football , Volume 7 (1): 7 – Jan 2, 2023
7 pages

Injury, illness, and medication use surveillance during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s championship: a prospective cohort study of football players from Southern Africa

Abstract

Background Systematic analyses of injuries, illnesses or medication use and their risk factors among female African athletes are scarce, which has implications for management of these athletes. Aim This prospective cohort study analysed the incidence and characteristics of injuries, illnesses and medication use during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s Championship. Methods The medical personnel of all participating teams reported all new injuries, illnesses and medication used by players daily....
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2473-4446
eISSN
2473-3938
DOI
10.1080/24733938.2021.1971745
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Systematic analyses of injuries, illnesses or medication use and their risk factors among female African athletes are scarce, which has implications for management of these athletes. Aim This prospective cohort study analysed the incidence and characteristics of injuries, illnesses and medication use during the 2020 COSAFA Women’s Championship. Methods The medical personnel of all participating teams reported all new injuries, illnesses and medication used by players daily. Results Sixty-three injuries were reported: 45 match and 18 training injuries; 45.5 (95% CI: 32.2 to 58.8) injuries/1000 match-hours and 21.7 (95% CI: 11.7 to 31.7) injuries/1000 training-hours, respectively. Most (n = 55, 87%) were caused by contact with another player and involved the lower extremity (n = 43; 68%). Fifty-eight illnesses were reported: 44.4 (95% CI: 33.0 to 58.8) illnesses/1000 player-days, mostly diarrhoea (n = 25; 43.1%) and dysmenorrhoea (n = 18; 31%). No cases of COVID-19 were reported. In total, 175 medications were prescribed: 168.8 (95% CI: 143.8 to 193.8) medications/1000 player-days. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n = 60; 34.3%) and analgesics (n = 33; 18.9%) were the most commonly prescribed drugs. Conclusion Incidences of injury and illnesses were high but time loss was low, likely due to high NSAIDs use. Further studies should be conducted in order to inform appropriate prevention or management protocols in this population.

Journal

Science and Medicine in FootballTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2023

Keywords: Football; injuries; women; African

References