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Information Technology Investment: Decision-Making Methodology

Information Technology Investment: Decision-Making Methodology Book Review Reviewed by: Roberto Vinaja, Taas A&M University--Commerce Marc J. Schniederjans, Jamie L. Hamaker, Ashlyn M. Schniederjans, World Scientific Publishing, 2004, 389 pages. ISBN 981 -238-695-5 The objective of this book is to apply a broad array of methodologies to the IT investment decision-making (IT-IDM) process. This book is based on some of the latest research on IT investment decision-making. For most methodologies, the authors have: provided a definition, described the applications in IT investment decision-making, discussed the informational value, explained the data requirements and methodological procedures, included computer-based solutions, provided sample problems to illustrate different decision situations, identified limitations and suggested ideas for dealing with the limitations. Part I includes three chapters. Chapter 1 provides basic definitions, explains subject relevance, provides examples, and describes the role of IT investment "within organization strategic, tactical and operational planning." Chapter 2, "Needs Analysis and Alternatives IT Investment Strategies," redefines tactical steps in IT planning "that lead up to IT investment decision-making analysis." According to the authors "needs analysis, reengineering, and outsourcing are prerequisite procedural methods to determine the specifications of IT needs." The last step requires the evaluation of IT alternatives in terms of their "prospective contribution to the organization." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Global Information Technology Management Taylor & Francis

Information Technology Investment: Decision-Making Methodology

Information Technology Investment: Decision-Making Methodology

Abstract

Book Review Reviewed by: Roberto Vinaja, Taas A&M University--Commerce Marc J. Schniederjans, Jamie L. Hamaker, Ashlyn M. Schniederjans, World Scientific Publishing, 2004, 389 pages. ISBN 981 -238-695-5 The objective of this book is to apply a broad array of methodologies to the IT investment decision-making (IT-IDM) process. This book is based on some of the latest research on IT investment decision-making. For most methodologies, the authors have: provided a definition, described the...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2333-6846
eISSN
1097-198X
DOI
10.1080/1097198X.2005.10856404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Review Reviewed by: Roberto Vinaja, Taas A&M University--Commerce Marc J. Schniederjans, Jamie L. Hamaker, Ashlyn M. Schniederjans, World Scientific Publishing, 2004, 389 pages. ISBN 981 -238-695-5 The objective of this book is to apply a broad array of methodologies to the IT investment decision-making (IT-IDM) process. This book is based on some of the latest research on IT investment decision-making. For most methodologies, the authors have: provided a definition, described the applications in IT investment decision-making, discussed the informational value, explained the data requirements and methodological procedures, included computer-based solutions, provided sample problems to illustrate different decision situations, identified limitations and suggested ideas for dealing with the limitations. Part I includes three chapters. Chapter 1 provides basic definitions, explains subject relevance, provides examples, and describes the role of IT investment "within organization strategic, tactical and operational planning." Chapter 2, "Needs Analysis and Alternatives IT Investment Strategies," redefines tactical steps in IT planning "that lead up to IT investment decision-making analysis." According to the authors "needs analysis, reengineering, and outsourcing are prerequisite procedural methods to determine the specifications of IT needs." The last step requires the evaluation of IT alternatives in terms of their "prospective contribution to the organization."

Journal

Journal of Global Information Technology ManagementTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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