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Independent advocacy and the “rise of spirituality”: views from advocates, service users and chaplains

Independent advocacy and the “rise of spirituality”: views from advocates, service users and... The Mental Capacity Act (2005) and the amendments to the Mental Health Act (1983) in 2007–which came into effect in 2007 and 2009, respectively, in England and Wales–made it a statutory duty for the NHS and local authorities to refer to advocacy services. This is part of a growth in advocacy which coincides with an increase in literature on mental health and spirituality. Independent advocates and spiritual care coordinators (or chaplains) provide expressions of advocacy. For Independent Mental Capacity Advocates, social, cultural and spiritual factors are influential. Research involved a literature review on the history of advocacy and interviews with over 30 advocates, chaplains and service users and subsequent grounded theory analysis. The attested “rediscovery of the spiritual dimension in health and social care” was supported by overlaps in the practices of advocates and chaplains. This highlighted shortcomings around the professionalisation of advocacy in relation to culture and spirituality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Mental Health, Religion & Culture" Taylor & Francis

Independent advocacy and the “rise of spirituality”: views from advocates, service users and chaplains

"Mental Health, Religion & Culture" , Volume 13 (6): 12 – Sep 1, 2010
12 pages

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References (69)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9737
eISSN
1367-4676
DOI
10.1080/13674676.2010.488435
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Mental Capacity Act (2005) and the amendments to the Mental Health Act (1983) in 2007–which came into effect in 2007 and 2009, respectively, in England and Wales–made it a statutory duty for the NHS and local authorities to refer to advocacy services. This is part of a growth in advocacy which coincides with an increase in literature on mental health and spirituality. Independent advocates and spiritual care coordinators (or chaplains) provide expressions of advocacy. For Independent Mental Capacity Advocates, social, cultural and spiritual factors are influential. Research involved a literature review on the history of advocacy and interviews with over 30 advocates, chaplains and service users and subsequent grounded theory analysis. The attested “rediscovery of the spiritual dimension in health and social care” was supported by overlaps in the practices of advocates and chaplains. This highlighted shortcomings around the professionalisation of advocacy in relation to culture and spirituality.

Journal

"Mental Health, Religion & Culture"Taylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2010

Keywords: independent advocacy; theology; spirituality; well-being; professional studies; training

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