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Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education

Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education Robert G. Bringle Julie A. Hatcher Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education I n a recent article, "Creating the New America n College," Ernest Boyer challenges higher education to reconsider its mission to be that of educating students for a life as responsible citizens, rather than educating students solely for a career. By doing so, the "New American College" wil l take pride i n connecting theory to practice in order to meet challenging social problems, particularly those faced by universities i n urban settings. A s Ir a Harkavey of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Community Partnerships has noted, "Univer­ sities cannot afford to remain shores of affluence, self-importance and horticultural beauty at the edge of island seas of squalor, violence and despair" [5, p. A48]. Emphasizing service has the potential to enrich learning and renew communities, but will also give "new dignity to the scholarship of service" [5, p. A48]. Universities have valuable resources (for example, students, faculty, staff, classrooms, libraries, technology, research expertise) that become accessible to the community when partnerships address community needs. They also have a tradition of serving their communities by strengthening the economic development of the region, addressing edu­ cational and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Higher Education Taylor & Francis

Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education

Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 67 (2): 19 – Mar 1, 1996

Abstract

Robert G. Bringle Julie A. Hatcher Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education I n a recent article, "Creating the New America n College," Ernest Boyer challenges higher education to reconsider its mission to be that of educating students for a life as responsible citizens, rather than educating students solely for a career. By doing so, the "New American College" wil l take pride i n connecting theory to practice in order to meet challenging social problems, particularly those faced by universities i n urban settings. A s Ir a Harkavey of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Community Partnerships has noted, "Univer­ sities cannot afford to remain shores of affluence, self-importance and horticultural beauty at the edge of island seas of squalor, violence and despair" [5, p. A48]. Emphasizing service has the potential to enrich learning and renew communities, but will also give "new dignity to the scholarship of service" [5, p. A48]. Universities have valuable resources (for example, students, faculty, staff, classrooms, libraries, technology, research expertise) that become accessible to the community when partnerships address community needs. They also have a tradition of serving their communities by strengthening the economic development of the region, addressing edu­ cational and

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References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1996 Ohio State University Press
ISSN
1538-4640
eISSN
0022-1546
DOI
10.1080/00221546.1996.11780257
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Robert G. Bringle Julie A. Hatcher Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education I n a recent article, "Creating the New America n College," Ernest Boyer challenges higher education to reconsider its mission to be that of educating students for a life as responsible citizens, rather than educating students solely for a career. By doing so, the "New American College" wil l take pride i n connecting theory to practice in order to meet challenging social problems, particularly those faced by universities i n urban settings. A s Ir a Harkavey of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Community Partnerships has noted, "Univer­ sities cannot afford to remain shores of affluence, self-importance and horticultural beauty at the edge of island seas of squalor, violence and despair" [5, p. A48]. Emphasizing service has the potential to enrich learning and renew communities, but will also give "new dignity to the scholarship of service" [5, p. A48]. Universities have valuable resources (for example, students, faculty, staff, classrooms, libraries, technology, research expertise) that become accessible to the community when partnerships address community needs. They also have a tradition of serving their communities by strengthening the economic development of the region, addressing edu­ cational and

Journal

The Journal of Higher EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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