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Immobilis in mobili: performing arts, BCI, and locked-in syndrome

Immobilis in mobili: performing arts, BCI, and locked-in syndrome There are actors who cannot move. The question is, can they act? The traditional conception of performing arts would demand an answer in the negative. However, technology provides a way to go beyond the traditional definition and present people with locked-in syndrome or other severe motor impairments with the opportunity to claim a place in the performing arts. BCIs in particular represent an interesting venue for reaching this goal as they aim to provide an efficient mechanism of control of external systems and these external systems might, in turn, be defined, designed, and built with artistic expression purposes in mind. This paper proposes three conceptual models to guide the design of such systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Immobilis in mobili: performing arts, BCI, and locked-in syndrome

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 2 (2-3): 10 – Apr 3, 2015

Immobilis in mobili: performing arts, BCI, and locked-in syndrome

Abstract

There are actors who cannot move. The question is, can they act? The traditional conception of performing arts would demand an answer in the negative. However, technology provides a way to go beyond the traditional definition and present people with locked-in syndrome or other severe motor impairments with the opportunity to claim a place in the performing arts. BCIs in particular represent an interesting venue for reaching this goal as they aim to provide an efficient mechanism of control of...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2015.1100366
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are actors who cannot move. The question is, can they act? The traditional conception of performing arts would demand an answer in the negative. However, technology provides a way to go beyond the traditional definition and present people with locked-in syndrome or other severe motor impairments with the opportunity to claim a place in the performing arts. BCIs in particular represent an interesting venue for reaching this goal as they aim to provide an efficient mechanism of control of external systems and these external systems might, in turn, be defined, designed, and built with artistic expression purposes in mind. This paper proposes three conceptual models to guide the design of such systems.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2015

Keywords: BCI; locked-in syndrome; art; disability; symbiotic technology

References