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ICT pathways to poverty reduction: empirical evidence from East and Southern Africa

ICT pathways to poverty reduction: empirical evidence from East and Southern Africa Information Technology for Development, 2016 Vol. 22, No. 3, 539–540 BOOK REVIEW edited by Edith Ofwona Adera, Timothy M. Waema, Julian May, Ophelia Mascarenhas and Kathleen Diga, Rugby, UK, Practical Action Publishing and the International Development Research Centre of Canada, 2014, 254 pp., ISBN 978-1-85339-815-5 Those of us involved in the study and practice of development are partial towards success stories. As scholars we are enlightened by the insights success stories introduce and intrigued by the strategies they espouse. As practitioners we are inspired by the victories they share. But success stories deal with specific cases and cannot lay claim to generalizability. When examined under a positivist lens, success stories begin to diminish in lumens and are labeled as anecdotal. In an environment where results determine program continuity and project lifespans, economics and hard, empirical evidence reigns supreme. Interventions that fail to comply are cast into a limbo of doubt and face possible divestment. For so long, this has been the case with information and communication technology for development or ICT4D. Questioning the viability of ODA investments in ICT’s first and last mile linkages, detractors argue that there is little macro-economic evidence that establishes a clear causal relationship between http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Technology for Development Taylor & Francis

ICT pathways to poverty reduction: empirical evidence from East and Southern Africa

Information Technology for Development , Volume 22 (3): 2 – Jul 2, 2016

ICT pathways to poverty reduction: empirical evidence from East and Southern Africa

Abstract

Information Technology for Development, 2016 Vol. 22, No. 3, 539–540 BOOK REVIEW edited by Edith Ofwona Adera, Timothy M. Waema, Julian May, Ophelia Mascarenhas and Kathleen Diga, Rugby, UK, Practical Action Publishing and the International Development Research Centre of Canada, 2014, 254 pp., ISBN 978-1-85339-815-5 Those of us involved in the study and practice of development are partial towards success stories. As scholars we are enlightened by the insights success stories introduce...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014, Alexander Flor
ISSN
1554-0170
eISSN
0268-1102
DOI
10.1080/02681102.2014.923595
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information Technology for Development, 2016 Vol. 22, No. 3, 539–540 BOOK REVIEW edited by Edith Ofwona Adera, Timothy M. Waema, Julian May, Ophelia Mascarenhas and Kathleen Diga, Rugby, UK, Practical Action Publishing and the International Development Research Centre of Canada, 2014, 254 pp., ISBN 978-1-85339-815-5 Those of us involved in the study and practice of development are partial towards success stories. As scholars we are enlightened by the insights success stories introduce and intrigued by the strategies they espouse. As practitioners we are inspired by the victories they share. But success stories deal with specific cases and cannot lay claim to generalizability. When examined under a positivist lens, success stories begin to diminish in lumens and are labeled as anecdotal. In an environment where results determine program continuity and project lifespans, economics and hard, empirical evidence reigns supreme. Interventions that fail to comply are cast into a limbo of doubt and face possible divestment. For so long, this has been the case with information and communication technology for development or ICT4D. Questioning the viability of ODA investments in ICT’s first and last mile linkages, detractors argue that there is little macro-economic evidence that establishes a clear causal relationship between

Journal

Information Technology for DevelopmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 2, 2016

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