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“How I was then and how I am now”: an evaluation of the effects of being housed upon the Anxiety of Homeless persons in Regional Australia

“How I was then and how I am now”: an evaluation of the effects of being housed upon the Anxiety... Homelessness is universally regarded as an aversive condition, to be remedied by the provision of appropriate housing. However, although there are many reports of the negative effect of homelessness upon the mental health of homeless persons, relatively little has been reported regarding the change in mental health that might accompany being housed. To further understand that change, 71 previously-homeless persons from Regional Australia completed a series of questionnaires about their anxiety states when they were homeless and when they were housed. Results indicated that, although there was a major reduction in anxiety over that period, some participants did not change in their self-reported anxiety, and others reported that their anxiety had increased after being housed. Analysis of specific symptoms of anxiety revealed which aspects of anxiety had increased in some participants, and which had decreased in others. Implications for the matching of “person-to-housing-setting” are discussed, plus avenues for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

“How I was then and how I am now”: an evaluation of the effects of being housed upon the Anxiety of Homeless persons in Regional Australia

“How I was then and how I am now”: an evaluation of the effects of being housed upon the Anxiety of Homeless persons in Regional Australia

Abstract

Homelessness is universally regarded as an aversive condition, to be remedied by the provision of appropriate housing. However, although there are many reports of the negative effect of homelessness upon the mental health of homeless persons, relatively little has been reported regarding the change in mental health that might accompany being housed. To further understand that change, 71 previously-homeless persons from Regional Australia completed a series of questionnaires about their...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1080/10530789.2019.1646478
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Homelessness is universally regarded as an aversive condition, to be remedied by the provision of appropriate housing. However, although there are many reports of the negative effect of homelessness upon the mental health of homeless persons, relatively little has been reported regarding the change in mental health that might accompany being housed. To further understand that change, 71 previously-homeless persons from Regional Australia completed a series of questionnaires about their anxiety states when they were homeless and when they were housed. Results indicated that, although there was a major reduction in anxiety over that period, some participants did not change in their self-reported anxiety, and others reported that their anxiety had increased after being housed. Analysis of specific symptoms of anxiety revealed which aspects of anxiety had increased in some participants, and which had decreased in others. Implications for the matching of “person-to-housing-setting” are discussed, plus avenues for future research.

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 2, 2020

Keywords: Homelessness; anxiety; depression; Australia; housing

References