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Homelessness and inhalant abuse: an interdisciplinary case study involving cognition, brain connectivity and social behavior

Homelessness and inhalant abuse: an interdisciplinary case study involving cognition, brain... This work presents an interdisciplinary case study of a man who has used inhalants for 15 years and has been homeless since childhood. He exhibited a reduction in brain white matter and mild deterioration in memory and attention. However, other cognitive and construct abilities were intact and functionally observed in activities related to work, play, and survival during his life on the streets. Impairments in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices may be implicated in the participant’s inhalant abuse, while decreased functional connectivity involving the language network may explain the participant’s difficulty to verbally express his feelings and life story. Inhalants impair brain white matter, resulting in cognitive, affective, and social insufficiencies. However, the participant does not use other substances and expressed healthy habits and empathic concern towards others. In addition, life on the street creates community bonds and challenges people with stimulation which could lessen the effects of inhalants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

Homelessness and inhalant abuse: an interdisciplinary case study involving cognition, brain connectivity and social behavior

Homelessness and inhalant abuse: an interdisciplinary case study involving cognition, brain connectivity and social behavior

Journal of Social Distress and Homeless , Volume OnlineFirst: 6 – May 6, 2022

Abstract

This work presents an interdisciplinary case study of a man who has used inhalants for 15 years and has been homeless since childhood. He exhibited a reduction in brain white matter and mild deterioration in memory and attention. However, other cognitive and construct abilities were intact and functionally observed in activities related to work, play, and survival during his life on the streets. Impairments in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices may be implicated in the participant’s inhalant abuse, while decreased functional connectivity involving the language network may explain the participant’s difficulty to verbally express his feelings and life story. Inhalants impair brain white matter, resulting in cognitive, affective, and social insufficiencies. However, the participant does not use other substances and expressed healthy habits and empathic concern towards others. In addition, life on the street creates community bonds and challenges people with stimulation which could lessen the effects of inhalants.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1080/10530789.2022.2069403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This work presents an interdisciplinary case study of a man who has used inhalants for 15 years and has been homeless since childhood. He exhibited a reduction in brain white matter and mild deterioration in memory and attention. However, other cognitive and construct abilities were intact and functionally observed in activities related to work, play, and survival during his life on the streets. Impairments in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices may be implicated in the participant’s inhalant abuse, while decreased functional connectivity involving the language network may explain the participant’s difficulty to verbally express his feelings and life story. Inhalants impair brain white matter, resulting in cognitive, affective, and social insufficiencies. However, the participant does not use other substances and expressed healthy habits and empathic concern towards others. In addition, life on the street creates community bonds and challenges people with stimulation which could lessen the effects of inhalants.

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: May 6, 2022

Keywords: Inhalants; homelessness; brain connectivity; social behavior; interdisciplinary approaches

References