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Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style

Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style Editor S Desk Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style Paul S. Licker, Oakland University, USA, licker@oakland.edu CHANGES, CHANGES, CHANGES Information Technology Management has changed dramatically in the past half century but we assume that business, while subject to a number of dynamic forces, is still relatively stable in the sense that an organization can choose to be in a particular business and pursue that for some period of time. We assume that business models can change but only slowly and relatively infrequently. We assume the stability of the workforce and user characteristics and the orderly change of technologies (generally higher capability at lower cost) through a progression of stages. Our academic and practical (including market) research is conditioned to these assumptions, of course; otherwise we wouldn't go to the trouble to spend any time collecting data, suspecting that data wouldn't bear on any reality that had any continuity. Given the length of time it takes to train IT professionals, we hope that skills are transferable slowly over time to new technologies. And we think that IT management will slowly track these changes, slowly enough for us to theorize, study, understand and document it and publish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Global Information Technology Management Taylor & Francis

Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style

Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style

Abstract

Editor S Desk Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style Paul S. Licker, Oakland University, USA, licker@oakland.edu CHANGES, CHANGES, CHANGES Information Technology Management has changed dramatically in the past half century but we assume that business, while subject to a number of dynamic forces, is still relatively stable in the sense that an organization can choose to be in a particular business and pursue that for some period of time. We assume that business models...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2333-6846
eISSN
1097-198X
DOI
10.1080/1097198X.2006.10856423
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editor S Desk Global Technology Management in the Age of Economies of Style Paul S. Licker, Oakland University, USA, licker@oakland.edu CHANGES, CHANGES, CHANGES Information Technology Management has changed dramatically in the past half century but we assume that business, while subject to a number of dynamic forces, is still relatively stable in the sense that an organization can choose to be in a particular business and pursue that for some period of time. We assume that business models can change but only slowly and relatively infrequently. We assume the stability of the workforce and user characteristics and the orderly change of technologies (generally higher capability at lower cost) through a progression of stages. Our academic and practical (including market) research is conditioned to these assumptions, of course; otherwise we wouldn't go to the trouble to spend any time collecting data, suspecting that data wouldn't bear on any reality that had any continuity. Given the length of time it takes to train IT professionals, we hope that skills are transferable slowly over time to new technologies. And we think that IT management will slowly track these changes, slowly enough for us to theorize, study, understand and document it and publish

Journal

Journal of Global Information Technology ManagementTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2006

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