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Evaluating Internal Public Relations Using the Critical Incident Technique

Evaluating Internal Public Relations Using the Critical Incident Technique Although the critical incident technique (CIT) is one of the current methods in communication audits, little is known about the way it works. The validity of the CIT in the context of internal public relations depends on 3 assumptions: that participants can describe discrete communication events, that these events have structural connotations, and that they are related to sensemaking. We reviewed these assumptions with CIT data collected within 3 organizations. In this study, participants predominantly mentioned discrete events. Most events related to structural aspects of communication, and in many cases the events were linked to individual sensemaking or storytelling activities. The findings confirm the CIT's potential to assess the quality of internal communication. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Evaluating Internal Public Relations Using the Critical Incident Technique

Evaluating Internal Public Relations Using the Critical Incident Technique

Abstract

Although the critical incident technique (CIT) is one of the current methods in communication audits, little is known about the way it works. The validity of the CIT in the context of internal public relations depends on 3 assumptions: that participants can describe discrete communication events, that these events have structural connotations, and that they are related to sensemaking. We reviewed these assumptions with CIT data collected within 3 organizations. In this study, participants...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/1062726X.2014.924840
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the critical incident technique (CIT) is one of the current methods in communication audits, little is known about the way it works. The validity of the CIT in the context of internal public relations depends on 3 assumptions: that participants can describe discrete communication events, that these events have structural connotations, and that they are related to sensemaking. We reviewed these assumptions with CIT data collected within 3 organizations. In this study, participants predominantly mentioned discrete events. Most events related to structural aspects of communication, and in many cases the events were linked to individual sensemaking or storytelling activities. The findings confirm the CIT's potential to assess the quality of internal communication.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References