Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Evaluating housing performance in relation to human behaviour: new challenges

Evaluating housing performance in relation to human behaviour: new challenges BUILDING RESEARCH &INFORMATION (2010) 38(5), 437 – 441 EDITORIAL Evaluating housing performance in relation to human behaviour: new challenges There has been relatively little published POE of The current context housing compared with other sectors. There are In 2001, in a previous issue of this journal, Sir Andrew many reasons for this, not the least of which is the dif- Derbyshire wrote: ficulty of gaining a representative sample to benchmark in any particular housing development. Simply gaining How do we persuade the industry at large that access to people’s homes, which are private by their POE [post-occupancy evaluation] is doable and nature, can present a real barrier. Traditionally, the worthwhile? evaluation of housing performance has consisted of (Derbyshire, 2001, p. 82) either physical monitoring or occupancy satisfaction Nine years later, Building Performance Evaluation questionnaires, but quantitative and qualitative feed- (BPE), in which POE plays a significant role, appears back are rarely related to each other as they span to be more established, with governments and their across the disciplines of building science and social agencies recognizing the importance of finding out science. The evaluation of user perceptions and behav- how well their building investments have performed iour in relation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building Research & Information Taylor & Francis

Evaluating housing performance in relation to human behaviour: new challenges

5 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/evaluating-housing-performance-in-relation-to-human-behaviour-new-kVF1628yLn

References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4321
eISSN
0961-3218
DOI
10.1080/09613218.2010.497282
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BUILDING RESEARCH &INFORMATION (2010) 38(5), 437 – 441 EDITORIAL Evaluating housing performance in relation to human behaviour: new challenges There has been relatively little published POE of The current context housing compared with other sectors. There are In 2001, in a previous issue of this journal, Sir Andrew many reasons for this, not the least of which is the dif- Derbyshire wrote: ficulty of gaining a representative sample to benchmark in any particular housing development. Simply gaining How do we persuade the industry at large that access to people’s homes, which are private by their POE [post-occupancy evaluation] is doable and nature, can present a real barrier. Traditionally, the worthwhile? evaluation of housing performance has consisted of (Derbyshire, 2001, p. 82) either physical monitoring or occupancy satisfaction Nine years later, Building Performance Evaluation questionnaires, but quantitative and qualitative feed- (BPE), in which POE plays a significant role, appears back are rarely related to each other as they span to be more established, with governments and their across the disciplines of building science and social agencies recognizing the importance of finding out science. The evaluation of user perceptions and behav- how well their building investments have performed iour in relation

Journal

Building Research & InformationTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2010

There are no references for this article.