Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ethno-racial identification in urban Peru

Ethno-racial identification in urban Peru Abstract This study examines ethno-racial identification among urban Peruvians, with special attention to those who are at risk of ‘de-Indianizing’. Specifically, we use a nationally representative survey to describe how city residents classify themselves and how self-classifications are associated with primordial and circumstantial characteristics. Consistent with official statistics, a large majority identifies as mestizo. However, the share that self-identifies as indigenous is much smaller than expected from official language-based criteria or from appearance alone. Moreover, identification is rooted in primordial characteristics associated with descent and the family-of-origin's linguistic environment, particularly for those with indigenous ancestries. Identification is also linked to socio-economic circumstances and perceived discrimination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnic and Racial Studies Taylor & Francis

Ethno-racial identification in urban Peru

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 35 (7): 28 – Jul 1, 2012
28 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/ethno-racial-identification-in-urban-peru-M26Cf40DT4

References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4356
eISSN
0141-9870
DOI
10.1080/01419870.2011.605900
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This study examines ethno-racial identification among urban Peruvians, with special attention to those who are at risk of ‘de-Indianizing’. Specifically, we use a nationally representative survey to describe how city residents classify themselves and how self-classifications are associated with primordial and circumstantial characteristics. Consistent with official statistics, a large majority identifies as mestizo. However, the share that self-identifies as indigenous is much smaller than expected from official language-based criteria or from appearance alone. Moreover, identification is rooted in primordial characteristics associated with descent and the family-of-origin's linguistic environment, particularly for those with indigenous ancestries. Identification is also linked to socio-economic circumstances and perceived discrimination.

Journal

Ethnic and Racial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2012

Keywords: Ethnicity; identity; indigenous; discrimination; Peru; Latin America

There are no references for this article.