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Engineering Architecture

Engineering Architecture EDITORIAL It seems odd or at least disconcerting that until French engineer and physicist Charles- Engineering Augustin Coulomb imparted to the western world a shear stress equation in the late eighteenth century, there was little in statics other than Galileo’s equations for tensile Architecture 1 strength to engineer structures. Of course, Galileo’s equations only applied to stone and wood: not a specific wood, just wood. The introduction in the nineteenth cen- Winifred Elysse Newman, Executive Editor tury of empirical research on the specificity of the strengths of different wood fibers, Clemson University steel, and finally concrete emerges together with the introduction of these materials in large-scale architectures. This suggests some connective tissue or, at the very least, a dialectical relationship between form and matter that persists as theory and applica- tion in the business of building things. Engineering architecture can be read as a verb and a subject. Racing through early twentieth-century experiments in glass, steel, and concrete, the modern city’s skyline describes the arc of this ever-complicated rela- tionship between optimization and expression characterized by Gustave Eiffel, a not- so-conservative engineer looking to foment a brighter future through an expressive paean to technology. It is easy, even today, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Technology Architecture + Design Taylor & Francis

Engineering Architecture

Technology Architecture + Design , Volume 6 (2): 1 – Jul 3, 2022

Engineering Architecture

Abstract

EDITORIAL It seems odd or at least disconcerting that until French engineer and physicist Charles- Engineering Augustin Coulomb imparted to the western world a shear stress equation in the late eighteenth century, there was little in statics other than Galileo’s equations for tensile Architecture 1 strength to engineer structures. Of course, Galileo’s equations only applied to stone and wood: not a specific wood, just wood. The introduction in the nineteenth cen- Winifred Elysse...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
ISSN
2475-143x
eISSN
2475-1448
DOI
10.1080/24751448.2022.2114230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL It seems odd or at least disconcerting that until French engineer and physicist Charles- Engineering Augustin Coulomb imparted to the western world a shear stress equation in the late eighteenth century, there was little in statics other than Galileo’s equations for tensile Architecture 1 strength to engineer structures. Of course, Galileo’s equations only applied to stone and wood: not a specific wood, just wood. The introduction in the nineteenth cen- Winifred Elysse Newman, Executive Editor tury of empirical research on the specificity of the strengths of different wood fibers, Clemson University steel, and finally concrete emerges together with the introduction of these materials in large-scale architectures. This suggests some connective tissue or, at the very least, a dialectical relationship between form and matter that persists as theory and applica- tion in the business of building things. Engineering architecture can be read as a verb and a subject. Racing through early twentieth-century experiments in glass, steel, and concrete, the modern city’s skyline describes the arc of this ever-complicated rela- tionship between optimization and expression characterized by Gustave Eiffel, a not- so-conservative engineer looking to foment a brighter future through an expressive paean to technology. It is easy, even today,

Journal

Technology Architecture + DesignTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 3, 2022

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