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Effects of Perceived Economic Harms and Benefits on Issue Involvement, Use of Information Sources, and Actions: A Study in Risk Communication

Effects of Perceived Economic Harms and Benefits on Issue Involvement, Use of Information... Using a telephone survey of 203 residents in Point Comfort and Port Lavaca, Texas, we examined the effect of perceived economic benefits or losses on issue involvement and motivation to use information sources and take action. Results indicate that perceptions of the effect that a chemical plant—as a source of risk—has on economic benefits or losses increase cognitive involvement and motivate people to strategically use information and take action. A curvilinear relation was found between involvement and economic benefits. People who perceive financial impact show high involvement (both positive and negative); those who perceive little or no economic impact experience lower involvement. People with high negative involvement are more likely to take action against the plant and become activists. As the basis of involvement, we asked people to consider financial loss or gain, as well as environrnental impact. We also compared the information-use and action-taking options of general publics to involved publics. This analysis is interpreted to confirm and expand situational theory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Effects of Perceived Economic Harms and Benefits on Issue Involvement, Use of Information Sources, and Actions: A Study in Risk Communication

Effects of Perceived Economic Harms and Benefits on Issue Involvement, Use of Information Sources, and Actions: A Study in Risk Communication

Abstract

Using a telephone survey of 203 residents in Point Comfort and Port Lavaca, Texas, we examined the effect of perceived economic benefits or losses on issue involvement and motivation to use information sources and take action. Results indicate that perceptions of the effect that a chemical plant—as a source of risk—has on economic benefits or losses increase cognitive involvement and motivate people to strategically use information and take action. A curvilinear relation was...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1207/s1532754xjprr0702_01
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a telephone survey of 203 residents in Point Comfort and Port Lavaca, Texas, we examined the effect of perceived economic benefits or losses on issue involvement and motivation to use information sources and take action. Results indicate that perceptions of the effect that a chemical plant—as a source of risk—has on economic benefits or losses increase cognitive involvement and motivate people to strategically use information and take action. A curvilinear relation was found between involvement and economic benefits. People who perceive financial impact show high involvement (both positive and negative); those who perceive little or no economic impact experience lower involvement. People with high negative involvement are more likely to take action against the plant and become activists. As the basis of involvement, we asked people to consider financial loss or gain, as well as environrnental impact. We also compared the information-use and action-taking options of general publics to involved publics. This analysis is interpreted to confirm and expand situational theory.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 1995

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