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Editor’s essay: Reflecting on OPR research

Editor’s essay: Reflecting on OPR research JOURNAL OF PUBLIC RELATIONS RESEARCH 2022, VOL. 34, NO. 5, 175–178 https://doi.org/10.1080/1062726X.2022.2125152 Ferguson’s (1984) call for a paradigm shift in public relations research, namely to focus on relation- ships themselves as the unit of analysis rather than the individuals and entities engaged in those relationships, ranks among the most influential pieces of scholarship in our field – so much so that previous editor-in-chief Bey-Ling Sha requested a 2018 reprint in this journal. Ferguson’s (2018) piece is by far the most cited manuscript published in the Journal of Public Relations Research over the past five years, a testament to her idea’s lasting legacy. Ferguson’s (1984, 2018) work is the foundation stone of the organizational-public relationship paradigm, a bedrock of public relations scholarship for at least the past two decades. Ledingham and colleagues were among the earliest to intensely push this construct forward and the first to codify a general theory of relationship management. Ledingham and Bruning (1998) defined an OPR as “the state which exists between an organization and its key publics in which the actions of either entity impact the economic, social, political and/or cultural well-being of the other entity” (p. 62). Ledingham (2003) would later propose 14 axioms http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Editor’s essay: Reflecting on OPR research

Editor’s essay: Reflecting on OPR research

Abstract

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC RELATIONS RESEARCH 2022, VOL. 34, NO. 5, 175–178 https://doi.org/10.1080/1062726X.2022.2125152 Ferguson’s (1984) call for a paradigm shift in public relations research, namely to focus on relation- ships themselves as the unit of analysis rather than the individuals and entities engaged in those relationships, ranks among the most influential pieces of scholarship in our field – so much so that previous editor-in-chief Bey-Ling Sha requested a 2018 reprint...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/1062726X.2022.2125152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC RELATIONS RESEARCH 2022, VOL. 34, NO. 5, 175–178 https://doi.org/10.1080/1062726X.2022.2125152 Ferguson’s (1984) call for a paradigm shift in public relations research, namely to focus on relation- ships themselves as the unit of analysis rather than the individuals and entities engaged in those relationships, ranks among the most influential pieces of scholarship in our field – so much so that previous editor-in-chief Bey-Ling Sha requested a 2018 reprint in this journal. Ferguson’s (2018) piece is by far the most cited manuscript published in the Journal of Public Relations Research over the past five years, a testament to her idea’s lasting legacy. Ferguson’s (1984, 2018) work is the foundation stone of the organizational-public relationship paradigm, a bedrock of public relations scholarship for at least the past two decades. Ledingham and colleagues were among the earliest to intensely push this construct forward and the first to codify a general theory of relationship management. Ledingham and Bruning (1998) defined an OPR as “the state which exists between an organization and its key publics in which the actions of either entity impact the economic, social, political and/or cultural well-being of the other entity” (p. 62). Ledingham (2003) would later propose 14 axioms

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 3, 2022

References