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Designing for Home-Based Work – Lessons from Two English Villages

Designing for Home-Based Work – Lessons from Two English Villages AbstractContemporary home-based work is generally either invisible or ignored, despite the fact that almost one in three members of the working population in the most rural areas in England now works at or from home and home-based businesses are the driving force in many rural economies. Asking how design could support or develop this aspect of rurality, this paper draws on an ethnographic/architectural study of the lives and premises of home-based workers in two villages in investigating the extent to which the idea of extended fungibility might apply in each location. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Designing for Home-Based Work – Lessons from Two English Villages

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (1): 19 – Jan 2, 2017

Designing for Home-Based Work – Lessons from Two English Villages

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (1): 19 – Jan 2, 2017

Abstract

AbstractContemporary home-based work is generally either invisible or ignored, despite the fact that almost one in three members of the working population in the most rural areas in England now works at or from home and home-based businesses are the driving force in many rural economies. Asking how design could support or develop this aspect of rurality, this paper draws on an ethnographic/architectural study of the lives and premises of home-based workers in two villages in investigating the extent to which the idea of extended fungibility might apply in each location.

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References (49)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2017.1283127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractContemporary home-based work is generally either invisible or ignored, despite the fact that almost one in three members of the working population in the most rural areas in England now works at or from home and home-based businesses are the driving force in many rural economies. Asking how design could support or develop this aspect of rurality, this paper draws on an ethnographic/architectural study of the lives and premises of home-based workers in two villages in investigating the extent to which the idea of extended fungibility might apply in each location.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2017

Keywords: design; home-based work; village; live/work; extended fungibility; flexibility; loose fit

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