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Design requirements and potential target users for brain-computer interfaces – recommendations from rehabilitation professionals

Design requirements and potential target users for brain-computer interfaces – recommendations... It is an implicit assumption in the field of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) that BCIs can be satisfactorily used to access augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods by people with severe physical disabilities. A one-day workshop and focus group interview was held to investigate this assumption. Rehabilitation professionals (N = 28) were asked to critically assess current BCI technology, recommend design requirements and identify target users. The individual answers were analyzed using the theoretical framework of grounded theory. None of the participants expressed a perception of added value of current BCIs over existing alternatives. A major criticism (and requirement) was that the usability of BCI systems should significantly improve. Target users are only those who can hardly or not at all use alternative access technologies. However, such persons often have concurrent physical, sensory, and cognitive problems, which could complicate BCI use. If successful BCI use continues to require a user to sit motionlessly and have intact cognition, then – as previously implicitly assumed – people in the locked-in state (resulting from late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy type II or classic or total locked-in syndrome) and people with high spinal cord injury (C1/C2) could be target users. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Design requirements and potential target users for brain-computer interfaces – recommendations from rehabilitation professionals

Design requirements and potential target users for brain-computer interfaces – recommendations from rehabilitation professionals

Abstract

It is an implicit assumption in the field of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) that BCIs can be satisfactorily used to access augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods by people with severe physical disabilities. A one-day workshop and focus group interview was held to investigate this assumption. Rehabilitation professionals (N = 28) were asked to critically assess current BCI technology, recommend design requirements and identify target users. The individual answers were...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2013.877210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is an implicit assumption in the field of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) that BCIs can be satisfactorily used to access augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods by people with severe physical disabilities. A one-day workshop and focus group interview was held to investigate this assumption. Rehabilitation professionals (N = 28) were asked to critically assess current BCI technology, recommend design requirements and identify target users. The individual answers were analyzed using the theoretical framework of grounded theory. None of the participants expressed a perception of added value of current BCIs over existing alternatives. A major criticism (and requirement) was that the usability of BCI systems should significantly improve. Target users are only those who can hardly or not at all use alternative access technologies. However, such persons often have concurrent physical, sensory, and cognitive problems, which could complicate BCI use. If successful BCI use continues to require a user to sit motionlessly and have intact cognition, then – as previously implicitly assumed – people in the locked-in state (resulting from late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy type II or classic or total locked-in syndrome) and people with high spinal cord injury (C1/C2) could be target users.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2014

Keywords: assistive technology; access technology; brain-computer interfaces; focus group interviews; system requirements; locked-in syndrome; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; spinal cord injury

References