Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Demonstration of a portable intracortical brain-computer interface

Demonstration of a portable intracortical brain-computer interface While recent advances in intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCI) have demonstrated the ability to restore motor and communication functions, such demonstrations have generally been confined to controlled experimental settings and have required bulky laboratory hardware. Here, we developed and evaluated a self-contained portable iBCI that enabled the user to interact with various computer programs. The iBCI, which weighs 1.5 kg, consists of digital headstages, a small signal processing hub, and a tablet PC. A human participant tested the portable iBCI in laboratory and home settings under an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (NCT01894802). The participant successfully completed 96% of trials in a 2D cursor center-out task with the portable iBCI, a rate indistinguishable from that achieved with the standard laboratory iBCI. The participant also completed a variety of free-form tasks, including drawing, gaming, and typing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Demonstration of a portable intracortical brain-computer interface

Demonstration of a portable intracortical brain-computer interface

Abstract

While recent advances in intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCI) have demonstrated the ability to restore motor and communication functions, such demonstrations have generally been confined to controlled experimental settings and have required bulky laboratory hardware. Here, we developed and evaluated a self-contained portable iBCI that enabled the user to interact with various computer programs. The iBCI, which weighs 1.5 kg, consists of digital headstages, a small signal processing...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/demonstration-of-a-portable-intracortical-brain-computer-interface-xmuLJEbezM
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2019.1709260
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While recent advances in intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCI) have demonstrated the ability to restore motor and communication functions, such demonstrations have generally been confined to controlled experimental settings and have required bulky laboratory hardware. Here, we developed and evaluated a self-contained portable iBCI that enabled the user to interact with various computer programs. The iBCI, which weighs 1.5 kg, consists of digital headstages, a small signal processing hub, and a tablet PC. A human participant tested the portable iBCI in laboratory and home settings under an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (NCT01894802). The participant successfully completed 96% of trials in a 2D cursor center-out task with the portable iBCI, a rate indistinguishable from that achieved with the standard laboratory iBCI. The participant also completed a variety of free-form tasks, including drawing, gaming, and typing.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2019

Keywords: Portable; intracortical brain-computer interface; spinal cord injury; computer access

References