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Cultural Determinants of Leaning Effectiveness from Knowledge Management Systems: A Multinational Investigation

Cultural Determinants of Leaning Effectiveness from Knowledge Management Systems: A Multinational... AbstractKnowledge is a vital component of organizational success embedded within the human resources of a firm (Grant, 1996). Knowledge is lost by organizations when it is not used or when knowledgeable individuals turnover. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) are designed to help organizations capture, store, distill, and distribute knowledge embedded within their employees. The effectiveness of KMS is dependent on individual learning and individual-specific learning preferences. Furthermore, as the world becomes more globalized and the job candidate pool from which organizations hire becomes more culturally diverse, the extent to which western models of organizational behavior hold becomes less clear. Using a multi-national survey, this study aims to determine to what extent learning preferences are dependent on culture. If learning preferences are dependent on culture, KMS designs that ignore culture may result in incomplete or ineffective knowledge transfer and learning outcomes. Our findings contribute to the KMS literature by suggesting that KMS design should be conducted with the goal of effectively facilitating learning across cultures. Specific KMS design recommendations include incorporating group activities and providing more flexibility, depending on the culturally derived learning preferences of specific users. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Global Information Technology Management Taylor & Francis

Cultural Determinants of Leaning Effectiveness from Knowledge Management Systems: A Multinational Investigation

Cultural Determinants of Leaning Effectiveness from Knowledge Management Systems: A Multinational Investigation

Abstract

AbstractKnowledge is a vital component of organizational success embedded within the human resources of a firm (Grant, 1996). Knowledge is lost by organizations when it is not used or when knowledgeable individuals turnover. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) are designed to help organizations capture, store, distill, and distribute knowledge embedded within their employees. The effectiveness of KMS is dependent on individual learning and individual-specific learning preferences. Furthermore,...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2333-6846
eISSN
1097-198X
DOI
10.1080/1097198X.2009.10856484
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractKnowledge is a vital component of organizational success embedded within the human resources of a firm (Grant, 1996). Knowledge is lost by organizations when it is not used or when knowledgeable individuals turnover. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) are designed to help organizations capture, store, distill, and distribute knowledge embedded within their employees. The effectiveness of KMS is dependent on individual learning and individual-specific learning preferences. Furthermore, as the world becomes more globalized and the job candidate pool from which organizations hire becomes more culturally diverse, the extent to which western models of organizational behavior hold becomes less clear. Using a multi-national survey, this study aims to determine to what extent learning preferences are dependent on culture. If learning preferences are dependent on culture, KMS designs that ignore culture may result in incomplete or ineffective knowledge transfer and learning outcomes. Our findings contribute to the KMS literature by suggesting that KMS design should be conducted with the goal of effectively facilitating learning across cultures. Specific KMS design recommendations include incorporating group activities and providing more flexibility, depending on the culturally derived learning preferences of specific users.

Journal

Journal of Global Information Technology ManagementTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: Knowledge Management Systems; Culture; Learning Preferences; Fit

References