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Continuity, transition and participation: Preparing clients for life in the community post-stroke

Continuity, transition and participation: Preparing clients for life in the community post-stroke Aims. To examine issues of continuity and transition facing clients as they return to life in the community following stroke and the role of rehabilitation in this process.Key findings and implications. The sudden onset of disability following a stroke represents a major disruption to the continuity of a person's life experience. Rehabilitation has an important role in the transition from the non-disabled to the disabled state however current rehabilitation services and outcomes post-stroke focus on functional recovery rather than on a return to meaningful roles and activities and pay little attention to the transition from the non-disabled to the disabled self. Although some current rehabilitation models address the importance of involvement in a life situation, they do not adequately address issues of the role of the environment, the nature of community, the importance of meaning and choice when thinking about life situations, and change in abilities across the life course.Conclusions. Models of rehabilitation service delivery need to move to a chronic disease management model that incorporates outcomes that are meaningful to clients, and not the assumed needs or outcomes as defined by rehabilitation professionals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability & Rehabilitation Taylor & Francis

Continuity, transition and participation: Preparing clients for life in the community post-stroke

Disability & Rehabilitation , Volume 29 (20-21): 9 – Jan 1, 2007
9 pages

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References (77)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2007 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1464-5165
eISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.1080/09638280701618588
pmid
17922327
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims. To examine issues of continuity and transition facing clients as they return to life in the community following stroke and the role of rehabilitation in this process.Key findings and implications. The sudden onset of disability following a stroke represents a major disruption to the continuity of a person's life experience. Rehabilitation has an important role in the transition from the non-disabled to the disabled state however current rehabilitation services and outcomes post-stroke focus on functional recovery rather than on a return to meaningful roles and activities and pay little attention to the transition from the non-disabled to the disabled self. Although some current rehabilitation models address the importance of involvement in a life situation, they do not adequately address issues of the role of the environment, the nature of community, the importance of meaning and choice when thinking about life situations, and change in abilities across the life course.Conclusions. Models of rehabilitation service delivery need to move to a chronic disease management model that incorporates outcomes that are meaningful to clients, and not the assumed needs or outcomes as defined by rehabilitation professionals.

Journal

Disability & RehabilitationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: Client-centred; stroke rehabilitation; transition; discharge

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