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Contextual and Audience Moderators of Channel Selection and Message Reception of Public Health Information in Routine and Crisis Situations

Contextual and Audience Moderators of Channel Selection and Message Reception of Public Health... A richer understanding of audience channel selection and message reception during routine and crisis situations through receiver-oriented research offers great promise to extend situational theory's predictive utility. Key variables of situational theory, including involvement, constraint, and problem recognition in information seeking and processing may be moderated by broader demographic and contextual factors in consumption of health information. Thus, situational theory frames this analysis of channels most important for public use in routine and crisis contexts in health information seeking, differences in preferences between contexts, and the criteria publics apply when evaluating the quality of health information. Results of a national random telephone survey (n = 400) indicate a need for more receiver-based studies in public relations, as involvement and demographics played key moderating roles in channel preferences. Use of several channels including radio, magazine, and television differed between crisis and routine contexts for health information consumers. In both crisis and routine contexts, those with high health involvement were more likely to use active media channels such as newspapers and magazines. Perceived accuracy is also revealed as a key criterion in evaluating the quality of health information consumers receive. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Contextual and Audience Moderators of Channel Selection and Message Reception of Public Health Information in Routine and Crisis Situations

Journal of Public Relations Research , Volume 22 (4): 26 – Sep 28, 2010
26 pages

Contextual and Audience Moderators of Channel Selection and Message Reception of Public Health Information in Routine and Crisis Situations

Abstract

A richer understanding of audience channel selection and message reception during routine and crisis situations through receiver-oriented research offers great promise to extend situational theory's predictive utility. Key variables of situational theory, including involvement, constraint, and problem recognition in information seeking and processing may be moderated by broader demographic and contextual factors in consumption of health information. Thus, situational theory frames this...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/10627261003801404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A richer understanding of audience channel selection and message reception during routine and crisis situations through receiver-oriented research offers great promise to extend situational theory's predictive utility. Key variables of situational theory, including involvement, constraint, and problem recognition in information seeking and processing may be moderated by broader demographic and contextual factors in consumption of health information. Thus, situational theory frames this analysis of channels most important for public use in routine and crisis contexts in health information seeking, differences in preferences between contexts, and the criteria publics apply when evaluating the quality of health information. Results of a national random telephone survey (n = 400) indicate a need for more receiver-based studies in public relations, as involvement and demographics played key moderating roles in channel preferences. Use of several channels including radio, magazine, and television differed between crisis and routine contexts for health information consumers. In both crisis and routine contexts, those with high health involvement were more likely to use active media channels such as newspapers and magazines. Perceived accuracy is also revealed as a key criterion in evaluating the quality of health information consumers receive.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 28, 2010

References