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Conceptual Narratives of Yung Ho Chang's Cross-cultural Practice

Conceptual Narratives of Yung Ho Chang's Cross-cultural Practice Under economic reform and social liberalization in post-Mao China, a new generation of independent Chinese architects has emerged. Among those architects, Yung Ho Chang is a pioneering and prominent figure. His design strategies are shaped primarily by his cross-cultural background and exposure. A salient feature of his works is conceptual narratives, in which the three major themes are everyday objects, voyeurism and the subversion of material norms. Apart from examining his conceptual narratives, this article also discusses his design-studio teaching at MIT, which signifies a shift toward a more socially responsive design approach. His practice continues to cross cultures, not only contributing to the development of contemporary Chinese architecture, but with growing influence worldwide. Besides architectural design, his practice is diverse and in some ways multidisciplinary, with participation in international exhibitions, curatorship, teaching, product design and publications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Conceptual Narratives of Yung Ho Chang's Cross-cultural Practice

Architecture and Culture , Volume 2 (2): 8 – Jul 1, 2014

Conceptual Narratives of Yung Ho Chang's Cross-cultural Practice

Architecture and Culture , Volume 2 (2): 8 – Jul 1, 2014

Abstract

Under economic reform and social liberalization in post-Mao China, a new generation of independent Chinese architects has emerged. Among those architects, Yung Ho Chang is a pioneering and prominent figure. His design strategies are shaped primarily by his cross-cultural background and exposure. A salient feature of his works is conceptual narratives, in which the three major themes are everyday objects, voyeurism and the subversion of material norms. Apart from examining his conceptual narratives, this article also discusses his design-studio teaching at MIT, which signifies a shift toward a more socially responsive design approach. His practice continues to cross cultures, not only contributing to the development of contemporary Chinese architecture, but with growing influence worldwide. Besides architectural design, his practice is diverse and in some ways multidisciplinary, with participation in international exhibitions, curatorship, teaching, product design and publications.

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References (15)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.2752/205078214X14030010182263
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Under economic reform and social liberalization in post-Mao China, a new generation of independent Chinese architects has emerged. Among those architects, Yung Ho Chang is a pioneering and prominent figure. His design strategies are shaped primarily by his cross-cultural background and exposure. A salient feature of his works is conceptual narratives, in which the three major themes are everyday objects, voyeurism and the subversion of material norms. Apart from examining his conceptual narratives, this article also discusses his design-studio teaching at MIT, which signifies a shift toward a more socially responsive design approach. His practice continues to cross cultures, not only contributing to the development of contemporary Chinese architecture, but with growing influence worldwide. Besides architectural design, his practice is diverse and in some ways multidisciplinary, with participation in international exhibitions, curatorship, teaching, product design and publications.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2014

Keywords: conceptual narratives; cross-cultural practice; Yung Ho Chang; contemporary Chinese architecture

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