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Computerized shop floor scheduling

Computerized shop floor scheduling Computerized shop floor scheduling is probably one of the most glaring examples of an area in which the tremendous efforts and investments of a large number of companies have produced at best only a partial solution. One of the more successful attempts is known as OPTR (optimized production technology) on which numerous papers have been published highlighting the various aspects of this package. What was realized by only a small group of people, namely the user base, was that this package was evolving at an incredible rate from one year to the next. This article describes that evolutionary process from basically a computerized Kanban to an attempted computerization of the Drum-Buffer-Rope technique. The major emphasis will not be so much on the technical developments, but more on the reasoning—gained from the experience of implementing this package—that brought this evolution so quickly to its ultimate conclusion. Namely, the real key lies mainly in the conceptual framework under which we run our organizations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Production Research Taylor & Francis

Computerized shop floor scheduling

Computerized shop floor scheduling

International Journal of Production Research , Volume 26 (3): 13 – Mar 1, 1988

Abstract

Computerized shop floor scheduling is probably one of the most glaring examples of an area in which the tremendous efforts and investments of a large number of companies have produced at best only a partial solution. One of the more successful attempts is known as OPTR (optimized production technology) on which numerous papers have been published highlighting the various aspects of this package. What was realized by only a small group of people, namely the user base, was that this package was evolving at an incredible rate from one year to the next. This article describes that evolutionary process from basically a computerized Kanban to an attempted computerization of the Drum-Buffer-Rope technique. The major emphasis will not be so much on the technical developments, but more on the reasoning—gained from the experience of implementing this package—that brought this evolution so quickly to its ultimate conclusion. Namely, the real key lies mainly in the conceptual framework under which we run our organizations.

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References (7)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-588X
eISSN
0020-7543
DOI
10.1080/00207548808947875
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Computerized shop floor scheduling is probably one of the most glaring examples of an area in which the tremendous efforts and investments of a large number of companies have produced at best only a partial solution. One of the more successful attempts is known as OPTR (optimized production technology) on which numerous papers have been published highlighting the various aspects of this package. What was realized by only a small group of people, namely the user base, was that this package was evolving at an incredible rate from one year to the next. This article describes that evolutionary process from basically a computerized Kanban to an attempted computerization of the Drum-Buffer-Rope technique. The major emphasis will not be so much on the technical developments, but more on the reasoning—gained from the experience of implementing this package—that brought this evolution so quickly to its ultimate conclusion. Namely, the real key lies mainly in the conceptual framework under which we run our organizations.

Journal

International Journal of Production ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1988

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