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Computer utilisation and staffing in Zambia: A survey conducted in late 1986

Computer utilisation and staffing in Zambia: A survey conducted in late 1986 Abstract In connection with the establishment of computer studies courses in Zambia, a study was conducted in late 1986 of computer utilization and staffing in the country. This article summarizes the findings of the survey. The picture which emerged was one of a small number of ‘traditional’ computer users having been joined since 1985 by a growing number of microcomputer users. Already, by 1986, the typical computer user was one who had acquired one or more microcomputers in the previous year or two, and was beginning to explore the potential of the technology. In response to questions about plans for the future, the respondents showed a high level of expectation of expanded use of computers. Plans generally involved the addition of micros to existing mainframe centres, of central mainframes or minis to existing micro users, and of telecommunications and networks in many cases. They suggested a strong trend towards distributed processing in the future. Shortage of computer staff and expertise was a problem and will continue to be one. No national courses producing professional computer staff existed at the time of the survey. The practice of sending staff abroad for computer training became prohibitively expensive when the external value of the Kwacha dropped dramatically in late 1985. A growing demand for computer training and updating of existing computer staff will call for major extension of domestic computer training. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Technology for Development Taylor & Francis

Computer utilisation and staffing in Zambia: A survey conducted in late 1986

Computer utilisation and staffing in Zambia: A survey conducted in late 1986

Abstract

Abstract In connection with the establishment of computer studies courses in Zambia, a study was conducted in late 1986 of computer utilization and staffing in the country. This article summarizes the findings of the survey. The picture which emerged was one of a small number of ‘traditional’ computer users having been joined since 1985 by a growing number of microcomputer users. Already, by 1986, the typical computer user was one who had acquired one or more microcomputers in...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1554-0170
eISSN
0268-1102
DOI
10.1080/02681102.1987.9627107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In connection with the establishment of computer studies courses in Zambia, a study was conducted in late 1986 of computer utilization and staffing in the country. This article summarizes the findings of the survey. The picture which emerged was one of a small number of ‘traditional’ computer users having been joined since 1985 by a growing number of microcomputer users. Already, by 1986, the typical computer user was one who had acquired one or more microcomputers in the previous year or two, and was beginning to explore the potential of the technology. In response to questions about plans for the future, the respondents showed a high level of expectation of expanded use of computers. Plans generally involved the addition of micros to existing mainframe centres, of central mainframes or minis to existing micro users, and of telecommunications and networks in many cases. They suggested a strong trend towards distributed processing in the future. Shortage of computer staff and expertise was a problem and will continue to be one. No national courses producing professional computer staff existed at the time of the survey. The practice of sending staff abroad for computer training became prohibitively expensive when the external value of the Kwacha dropped dramatically in late 1985. A growing demand for computer training and updating of existing computer staff will call for major extension of domestic computer training.

Journal

Information Technology for DevelopmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 1987

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