Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Company Affiliation and Communicative Ability: How Perceived Organizational Ties Influence Source Persuasiveness in a Company-Negative News Environment

Company Affiliation and Communicative Ability: How Perceived Organizational Ties Influence Source... The influence of attributing corrective information to different spokespersons in the wake of company-negative accusations was investigated experimentally. In particular, the research pitted a company's own public relations sources against sources working for a firm hired by the maligned organization and sources employed by agencies investigating negative claims independently. Results suggest that public relations sources are less credible than outside sources. Over time, however, public relations sources are judged as equally credible as hired and independent sources. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Company Affiliation and Communicative Ability: How Perceived Organizational Ties Influence Source Persuasiveness in a Company-Negative News Environment

Company Affiliation and Communicative Ability: How Perceived Organizational Ties Influence Source Persuasiveness in a Company-Negative News Environment

Abstract

The influence of attributing corrective information to different spokespersons in the wake of company-negative accusations was investigated experimentally. In particular, the research pitted a company's own public relations sources against sources working for a firm hired by the maligned organization and sources employed by agencies investigating negative claims independently. Results suggest that public relations sources are less credible than outside sources. Over time, however,...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/company-affiliation-and-communicative-ability-how-perceived-qXUtWTngCN
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1207/S1532754XJPRR1402_1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The influence of attributing corrective information to different spokespersons in the wake of company-negative accusations was investigated experimentally. In particular, the research pitted a company's own public relations sources against sources working for a firm hired by the maligned organization and sources employed by agencies investigating negative claims independently. Results suggest that public relations sources are less credible than outside sources. Over time, however, public relations sources are judged as equally credible as hired and independent sources.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.