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Cognitive Appraisal of Performance Capability in the Prevention of Drunken Driving: A Test of Self-Efficacy Theory

Cognitive Appraisal of Performance Capability in the Prevention of Drunken Driving: A Test of... This experiment tested predictions derived from self-efficacy theory by exposing participants to one of two public service announcements based on either symbolic modeling or persuasive efficacy information. Each message was designed to heighten participants' self-efficacy to prevent a friend from driving drunk. Participants in the symbolic modeling condition viewed a public service announcement that demonstrated how to dissuade a friend from driving drunk, and those in the verbal persuasion condition viewed an announcement that only advocated performing the task. A control announcement mentioned the consequences of arrest for drunken driving but contained no efficacy information. Data were gathered during laboratory sessions and during follow-up interviews 1 month later. Overall, laboratory findings supported the hypothesized ordered effects for sources of efficacy information: Symbolic modeling engendered greater efficacy expectations and behavioral intentions than did persuasive efficacy information, which in turn surpassed the control condition on some measures of self-efficacy, but not on behavioral intentions where neither condition differed. Follow-up data indicated that participants in the efficacy-information treatments were equally successful at dissuading a friend from driving drunk, whereas the controls were not. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Cognitive Appraisal of Performance Capability in the Prevention of Drunken Driving: A Test of Self-Efficacy Theory

Journal of Public Relations Research , Volume 7 (3): 25 – Jul 1, 1995

Cognitive Appraisal of Performance Capability in the Prevention of Drunken Driving: A Test of Self-Efficacy Theory

Abstract

This experiment tested predictions derived from self-efficacy theory by exposing participants to one of two public service announcements based on either symbolic modeling or persuasive efficacy information. Each message was designed to heighten participants' self-efficacy to prevent a friend from driving drunk. Participants in the symbolic modeling condition viewed a public service announcement that demonstrated how to dissuade a friend from driving drunk, and those in the verbal...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1207/s1532754xjprr0703_03
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This experiment tested predictions derived from self-efficacy theory by exposing participants to one of two public service announcements based on either symbolic modeling or persuasive efficacy information. Each message was designed to heighten participants' self-efficacy to prevent a friend from driving drunk. Participants in the symbolic modeling condition viewed a public service announcement that demonstrated how to dissuade a friend from driving drunk, and those in the verbal persuasion condition viewed an announcement that only advocated performing the task. A control announcement mentioned the consequences of arrest for drunken driving but contained no efficacy information. Data were gathered during laboratory sessions and during follow-up interviews 1 month later. Overall, laboratory findings supported the hypothesized ordered effects for sources of efficacy information: Symbolic modeling engendered greater efficacy expectations and behavioral intentions than did persuasive efficacy information, which in turn surpassed the control condition on some measures of self-efficacy, but not on behavioral intentions where neither condition differed. Follow-up data indicated that participants in the efficacy-information treatments were equally successful at dissuading a friend from driving drunk, whereas the controls were not.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1995

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