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Cognitive and psychosocial outcome following moderate or severe traumatic brain injury

Cognitive and psychosocial outcome following moderate or severe traumatic brain injury The outcome of 96 consecutive adult patients with moderate to severe head injury was sequentially measured at 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury. In addition to global outcome using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and a battery of neuropsychological tests of cognitive function, the Head Injury Symptom Checklist (HISC) and Relative's Questionnaire (RQ) were used. Although poorer GOS scores and severe cognitive impairments were typically associated with greater severity of initial injury, relatives reported similar functional problems irrespective of injury severity. This illustrates the legacy of moderate head injury in influencing many aspects of everyday life, supporting the argument that the needs of this group should not be overlooked. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Injury Taylor & Francis

Cognitive and psychosocial outcome following moderate or severe traumatic brain injury

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References (58)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1999 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1362-301X
eISSN
0269-9052
DOI
10.1080/026990599121403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The outcome of 96 consecutive adult patients with moderate to severe head injury was sequentially measured at 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury. In addition to global outcome using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and a battery of neuropsychological tests of cognitive function, the Head Injury Symptom Checklist (HISC) and Relative's Questionnaire (RQ) were used. Although poorer GOS scores and severe cognitive impairments were typically associated with greater severity of initial injury, relatives reported similar functional problems irrespective of injury severity. This illustrates the legacy of moderate head injury in influencing many aspects of everyday life, supporting the argument that the needs of this group should not be overlooked.

Journal

Brain InjuryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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