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Cognitive ability assessment by brain-computer interface II: application of a BCI-based assessment method for cognitive abilities

Cognitive ability assessment by brain-computer interface II: application of a BCI-based... Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can provide communication and environmental control to people with severe neuromuscular disease. This study uses a previously validated study (Perego et al. J Neurosci Methods. 2012;201:239–250) to analyze difficulties, results and performance of disabled people using BCIs for psychometric assessment. We use the same protocol proposed in the previous article with an SSVEP-based BCI and the Raven Coloured Progressive Matrix test, in order to verify if BCI can be used as a tool for psychometric assessment with neurologically impaired participants. Twenty-six patients participated in the test, but only 57.7% could correctly use an SSVEP-based BCI due to involuntary movements or muscle contraction, high electrode impedance and non-cooperation; only two subjects (one bilateral cerebral palsy and one with spinal cord injury) could not elicit a sufficient SSVEP pattern to control the BCI. Results show that the presence of neurological impairment does not affect the possibility of interacting with and controlling the BCI system; furthermore no significant differences could be found in IQ index obtained through the BCI and standard tests. Despite this, the chances of failing to establish effective BCI control are much higher among pathologic participants than healthy subjects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Cognitive ability assessment by brain-computer interface II: application of a BCI-based assessment method for cognitive abilities

Cognitive ability assessment by brain-computer interface II: application of a BCI-based assessment method for cognitive abilities

Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can provide communication and environmental control to people with severe neuromuscular disease. This study uses a previously validated study (Perego et al. J Neurosci Methods. 2012;201:239–250) to analyze difficulties, results and performance of disabled people using BCIs for psychometric assessment. We use the same protocol proposed in the previous article with an SSVEP-based BCI and the Raven Coloured Progressive Matrix test, in order...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2014.979727
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can provide communication and environmental control to people with severe neuromuscular disease. This study uses a previously validated study (Perego et al. J Neurosci Methods. 2012;201:239–250) to analyze difficulties, results and performance of disabled people using BCIs for psychometric assessment. We use the same protocol proposed in the previous article with an SSVEP-based BCI and the Raven Coloured Progressive Matrix test, in order to verify if BCI can be used as a tool for psychometric assessment with neurologically impaired participants. Twenty-six patients participated in the test, but only 57.7% could correctly use an SSVEP-based BCI due to involuntary movements or muscle contraction, high electrode impedance and non-cooperation; only two subjects (one bilateral cerebral palsy and one with spinal cord injury) could not elicit a sufficient SSVEP pattern to control the BCI. Results show that the presence of neurological impairment does not affect the possibility of interacting with and controlling the BCI system; furthermore no significant differences could be found in IQ index obtained through the BCI and standard tests. Despite this, the chances of failing to establish effective BCI control are much higher among pathologic participants than healthy subjects.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2014

Keywords: BCI; brain-computer interface; SSVEP; Raven test; cognitive assessment

References