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Changes in coping strategies, social support, optimism and health-related quality of life following traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal study

Changes in coping strategies, social support, optimism and health-related quality of life... Primary objective: To study longitudinal changes in psychological coping strategies, social support, life orientation and health-related quality of life in the late period after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Subjects: Thirty-one patients with TBI who were first investigated on average 2.3 years after injury and were prospectively followed on average 5.7 years later.Methods: Estonian versions of the COPE-D Test, the Brief Social Support Questionnaire, the Life Orientation Test and the RAND-36 questionnaire.Results: During the late follow-up period health-related quality of life and resuming work did not improve significantly. Persons with TBI reported an increase in seeking social/emotional support (p < 0.05), frequent use of avoidance-oriented styles and reduced use of task-oriented styles. This was accompanied by low social support and low satisfaction with support, both of which were associated with health-related quality of life and resuming work after TBI. Although the patients had become more optimistic (p < 0.05), this did not correlate with their health status and social well-being.Conclusions: This prospective study revealed maladaptive changes in the profile of coping strategies and an increase in optimism. As social support, satisfaction with support and health-related quality of life did not improve, then rehabilitation, social and psychological support are continuously needed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Injury Taylor & Francis

Changes in coping strategies, social support, optimism and health-related quality of life following traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal study

Brain Injury , Volume 21 (5): 10 – Jan 1, 2007
10 pages

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References (60)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2007 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1362-301X
eISSN
0269-9052
DOI
10.1080/02699050701311737
pmid
17522987
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Primary objective: To study longitudinal changes in psychological coping strategies, social support, life orientation and health-related quality of life in the late period after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Subjects: Thirty-one patients with TBI who were first investigated on average 2.3 years after injury and were prospectively followed on average 5.7 years later.Methods: Estonian versions of the COPE-D Test, the Brief Social Support Questionnaire, the Life Orientation Test and the RAND-36 questionnaire.Results: During the late follow-up period health-related quality of life and resuming work did not improve significantly. Persons with TBI reported an increase in seeking social/emotional support (p < 0.05), frequent use of avoidance-oriented styles and reduced use of task-oriented styles. This was accompanied by low social support and low satisfaction with support, both of which were associated with health-related quality of life and resuming work after TBI. Although the patients had become more optimistic (p < 0.05), this did not correlate with their health status and social well-being.Conclusions: This prospective study revealed maladaptive changes in the profile of coping strategies and an increase in optimism. As social support, satisfaction with support and health-related quality of life did not improve, then rehabilitation, social and psychological support are continuously needed.

Journal

Brain InjuryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: Coping strategies; social support; optimism; health-related quality of life; longitudinal changes; traumatic brain injury

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