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Challenging Horizontal Movement of the Body During Sit-to-Stand: Impact on Stability in the Young and Elderly

Challenging Horizontal Movement of the Body During Sit-to-Stand: Impact on Stability in the Young... There are 3 significant challenges to sit-to-stand: (a) bringing the center of mass forward, (b) vertically raising the center of mass from the sitting to standing position, and (c) transition from a relatively large and stable base of support in sitting to a considerably smaller base of support when standing. The authors explored the challenges to stability control following sit-to-stand when the requirement for horizontal movement of the center of mass was influenced by foot position and their potential effect on the preceding phases of sit-to-stand. Eleven healthy young and 11 healthy elderly individuals performed the sit-to-stand with their feet further away and closer to the chair. Kinetic and kinematic data were recorded. Regardless of foot position, challenges in stability were greater in elderly participants than young participants despite their similar movement time and shear forces. The greater instability in elderly participants, despite their comparable movement characteristics, emphasizes the importance of stability control following sit-to-stand performance. For both young and elderly participants, the sit-to-stand duration and the shear forces were greater in the far condition. However, foot position did not affect the stability measures (i.e., duration of the stabilization phase and the total center of pressure path during the 1st second of the stabilization phase). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Motor Behavior Taylor & Francis

Challenging Horizontal Movement of the Body During Sit-to-Stand: Impact on Stability in the Young and Elderly

Journal of Motor Behavior , Volume 43 (2): 7 – Feb 28, 2011
7 pages

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References (26)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-1027
eISSN
0022-2895
DOI
10.1080/00222895.2011.552077
pmid
21400328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are 3 significant challenges to sit-to-stand: (a) bringing the center of mass forward, (b) vertically raising the center of mass from the sitting to standing position, and (c) transition from a relatively large and stable base of support in sitting to a considerably smaller base of support when standing. The authors explored the challenges to stability control following sit-to-stand when the requirement for horizontal movement of the center of mass was influenced by foot position and their potential effect on the preceding phases of sit-to-stand. Eleven healthy young and 11 healthy elderly individuals performed the sit-to-stand with their feet further away and closer to the chair. Kinetic and kinematic data were recorded. Regardless of foot position, challenges in stability were greater in elderly participants than young participants despite their similar movement time and shear forces. The greater instability in elderly participants, despite their comparable movement characteristics, emphasizes the importance of stability control following sit-to-stand performance. For both young and elderly participants, the sit-to-stand duration and the shear forces were greater in the far condition. However, foot position did not affect the stability measures (i.e., duration of the stabilization phase and the total center of pressure path during the 1st second of the stabilization phase).

Journal

Journal of Motor BehaviorTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 28, 2011

Keywords: elderly; sit-to-stand; stability control

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