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Can teenagers control a 3D racing game using motion-onset visual evoked potentials?

Can teenagers control a 3D racing game using motion-onset visual evoked potentials? AbstractMotion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEPs) are time- and phase-locked brain responses to motion-related stimuli. An mVEP response provides robust features for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications and has the added benefit of being less visually fatiguing than other visual evoked potentials (VEPs). In this study an mVEP BCI that enables control of a visually rich, three-dimensional (3D) car-racing video game is evaluated. A group of 15 teenage schoolchildren (13–16 years old) participated in a single session while they attended a summer school. Participants were asked to control the direction of a car within a realistic racing circuit, where the position of the car was controlled by focusing on one of five motion-related stimuli. Classification accuracy (%) and information transfer rate (ITR) (bits per minute (bpm)) results were encouraging, with participants achieving an average online accuracy of 72% (12 bpm) in the first lap, 67% (10 bpm) in the second lap and 65% (10 bpm) in the third lap (chance accuracy and ITR is 20% and zero bpm). The study shows for the first time the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm in a commercial-grade car-racing video game. It is also one of the first reports on the performance of a group of teenagers using a BCI. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Can teenagers control a 3D racing game using motion-onset visual evoked potentials?

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 4 (1-2): 12 – Apr 3, 2017

Can teenagers control a 3D racing game using motion-onset visual evoked potentials?

Abstract

AbstractMotion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEPs) are time- and phase-locked brain responses to motion-related stimuli. An mVEP response provides robust features for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications and has the added benefit of being less visually fatiguing than other visual evoked potentials (VEPs). In this study an mVEP BCI that enables control of a visually rich, three-dimensional (3D) car-racing video game is evaluated. A group of 15 teenage schoolchildren...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2016.1266725
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractMotion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEPs) are time- and phase-locked brain responses to motion-related stimuli. An mVEP response provides robust features for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications and has the added benefit of being less visually fatiguing than other visual evoked potentials (VEPs). In this study an mVEP BCI that enables control of a visually rich, three-dimensional (3D) car-racing video game is evaluated. A group of 15 teenage schoolchildren (13–16 years old) participated in a single session while they attended a summer school. Participants were asked to control the direction of a car within a realistic racing circuit, where the position of the car was controlled by focusing on one of five motion-related stimuli. Classification accuracy (%) and information transfer rate (ITR) (bits per minute (bpm)) results were encouraging, with participants achieving an average online accuracy of 72% (12 bpm) in the first lap, 67% (10 bpm) in the second lap and 65% (10 bpm) in the third lap (chance accuracy and ITR is 20% and zero bpm). The study shows for the first time the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm in a commercial-grade car-racing video game. It is also one of the first reports on the performance of a group of teenagers using a BCI.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2017

Keywords: Motion-onset visually evoked potentials (mVEP); electroencephalography (EEG); video game; three-dimensional (3D)

References