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Brain Painting V2: evaluation of P300-based brain-computer interface for creative expression by an end-user following the user-centered design

Brain Painting V2: evaluation of P300-based brain-computer interface for creative expression by... Brain Painting is a brain-computer interface (BCI) application that allows for painting on a virtual canvas without requiring motor input. Following the user-centered design, we developed Brain Painting V2 (BP2) for two end-users with ALS (‘HP’ and ‘JT’) who use Brain Painting independently at home (BP1). After including line drawing and multiple shapes in BP2, we report the evaluation of 27 home use days by JT over 3.5 months. On scales from 0 to 10, the end-user indicated good satisfaction M = 7.1 (SD = 1.7), good enjoyment M = 6.9 (SD = 1.9) and low frustration M = 2.3 (SD = 2.5). Workload as measured once with the NASA Task Load Index was substantial (65/100). Satisfaction as assessed once with the QUEST2.0 was high (4.8/5) and maximum (5/5) for the BCI-specific aspects. Level of control predicted satisfaction, indicating the importance of maintaining high BCI accuracy. As results are based on one end-user only, they cannot be generalized to the population of potential BP2 end-users. However, the high satisfaction and the constant independent home use of BP2 by end-user JT illustrates that we provided JT with a BCI-controlled application which matches his needs and demonstrates the benefit of adopting user-centered design in BCI development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Brain Painting V2: evaluation of P300-based brain-computer interface for creative expression by an end-user following the user-centered design

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 2 (2-3): 15 – Apr 3, 2015

Brain Painting V2: evaluation of P300-based brain-computer interface for creative expression by an end-user following the user-centered design

Abstract

Brain Painting is a brain-computer interface (BCI) application that allows for painting on a virtual canvas without requiring motor input. Following the user-centered design, we developed Brain Painting V2 (BP2) for two end-users with ALS (‘HP’ and ‘JT’) who use Brain Painting independently at home (BP1). After including line drawing and multiple shapes in BP2, we report the evaluation of 27 home use days by JT over 3.5 months. On scales from 0 to 10, the end-user...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2015.1100038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brain Painting is a brain-computer interface (BCI) application that allows for painting on a virtual canvas without requiring motor input. Following the user-centered design, we developed Brain Painting V2 (BP2) for two end-users with ALS (‘HP’ and ‘JT’) who use Brain Painting independently at home (BP1). After including line drawing and multiple shapes in BP2, we report the evaluation of 27 home use days by JT over 3.5 months. On scales from 0 to 10, the end-user indicated good satisfaction M = 7.1 (SD = 1.7), good enjoyment M = 6.9 (SD = 1.9) and low frustration M = 2.3 (SD = 2.5). Workload as measured once with the NASA Task Load Index was substantial (65/100). Satisfaction as assessed once with the QUEST2.0 was high (4.8/5) and maximum (5/5) for the BCI-specific aspects. Level of control predicted satisfaction, indicating the importance of maintaining high BCI accuracy. As results are based on one end-user only, they cannot be generalized to the population of potential BP2 end-users. However, the high satisfaction and the constant independent home use of BP2 by end-user JT illustrates that we provided JT with a BCI-controlled application which matches his needs and demonstrates the benefit of adopting user-centered design in BCI development.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2015

Keywords: Brain Painting; user-centered design; electroencephalography; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; independent home use

References