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Brain-computer interface based motor and cognitive rehabilitation after stroke – state of the art, opportunity, and barriers: summary of the BCI Meeting 2016 in Asilomar

Brain-computer interface based motor and cognitive rehabilitation after stroke – state of the... AbstractNon-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a potential tool to support neuronal plasticity after stroke in the sub-acute and even in the chronic state. A few randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the positive effect on motor rehabilitation. Recent data also indicate that BCI training may improve cognitive rehabilitation. However, important questions remain to be addressed for implementing BCI-based rehabilitation in the clinical routine. This translational effort requires an interdisciplinary approach. The current article provides an overview of a stroke rehabilitation workshop of the 6th International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting in Asilomar, Pacific Grove, USA, held from 30 May to 3 June 2016. This workshop provided an overview of the current state of the art in BCI-based motor and cognitive rehabilitation, presented BCI set-ups shown to be effective, and concluded with a discussion of translational issues and barriers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Brain-computer interface based motor and cognitive rehabilitation after stroke – state of the art, opportunity, and barriers: summary of the BCI Meeting 2016 in Asilomar

Brain-computer interface based motor and cognitive rehabilitation after stroke – state of the art, opportunity, and barriers: summary of the BCI Meeting 2016 in Asilomar

Abstract

AbstractNon-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a potential tool to support neuronal plasticity after stroke in the sub-acute and even in the chronic state. A few randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the positive effect on motor rehabilitation. Recent data also indicate that BCI training may improve cognitive rehabilitation. However, important questions remain to be addressed for implementing BCI-based rehabilitation in the clinical...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2016.1246328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractNon-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a potential tool to support neuronal plasticity after stroke in the sub-acute and even in the chronic state. A few randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the positive effect on motor rehabilitation. Recent data also indicate that BCI training may improve cognitive rehabilitation. However, important questions remain to be addressed for implementing BCI-based rehabilitation in the clinical routine. This translational effort requires an interdisciplinary approach. The current article provides an overview of a stroke rehabilitation workshop of the 6th International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting in Asilomar, Pacific Grove, USA, held from 30 May to 3 June 2016. This workshop provided an overview of the current state of the art in BCI-based motor and cognitive rehabilitation, presented BCI set-ups shown to be effective, and concluded with a discussion of translational issues and barriers.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2017

Keywords: Brain-computer interface; stroke rehabilitation; motor function; cognitive function

References