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Book Review

Book Review Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 4, No. 4, 1995 Street Addicts in the Political Economy. By Alisse Waterston. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1993, 280. In this book, Alisse Waterston provides a fresh and illuminating anthropological perspective on the life and life-space of the street heroin addict in New York. The texture and topography of the addict's daily existence have never been presented in such detail and vividness. One reason for the richness of the description is the substantial number of quotations from the addicts themselves. These quotations flow naturally from the text and are never obtrusive. The verisimilitude of the book is all the more remarkable because Waterston did not herself interview the addicts. As part of a larger investigation of addicts' involvement in drug-related violent episodes, interviews with addicts were conducted between 1984 and 1987 on New York City's Lower East Side. The weekly interviews of addicts were conducted over an 8-week period, and inquired into their life histories, and their daily non-drug and drug-related activities and events. These tape-recorded and transcribed interviews provide the raw material for the ethnographic portraits in the book. Central to Waterston's approach is the political-economic perspective from which she http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

Book Review

Journal of Social Distress and Homeless , Volume 4 (4): 2 – Jan 1, 1995

Book Review

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 4, No. 4, 1995 Street Addicts in the Political Economy. By Alisse Waterston. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1993, 280. In this book, Alisse Waterston provides a fresh and illuminating anthropological perspective on the life and life-space of the street heroin addict in New York. The texture and topography of the addict's daily existence have never been presented in such detail and vividness. One reason for the richness of the...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1007/BF02087869
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 4, No. 4, 1995 Street Addicts in the Political Economy. By Alisse Waterston. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1993, 280. In this book, Alisse Waterston provides a fresh and illuminating anthropological perspective on the life and life-space of the street heroin addict in New York. The texture and topography of the addict's daily existence have never been presented in such detail and vividness. One reason for the richness of the description is the substantial number of quotations from the addicts themselves. These quotations flow naturally from the text and are never obtrusive. The verisimilitude of the book is all the more remarkable because Waterston did not herself interview the addicts. As part of a larger investigation of addicts' involvement in drug-related violent episodes, interviews with addicts were conducted between 1984 and 1987 on New York City's Lower East Side. The weekly interviews of addicts were conducted over an 8-week period, and inquired into their life histories, and their daily non-drug and drug-related activities and events. These tape-recorded and transcribed interviews provide the raw material for the ethnographic portraits in the book. Central to Waterston's approach is the political-economic perspective from which she

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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