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Blame attributions in sexual crimes: Effects of belief in a just world and victim behavior

Blame attributions in sexual crimes: Effects of belief in a just world and victim behavior Previous research has consistently shown that rape victims may be blamed for the assault but little is known about victim blaming in other sexual crimes. In the present experiment, we examined blame attributions for sexual assault and online sexual harassment. The study also investigated the effects of victim behavior, participants' belief in a just world, and participant gender on attributions of both victim and perpetrator blame. A vignette methodology was employed and a community sample (N = 200) answered questions of victim and perpetrator blame after reading one of four different scenarios (which manipulated crime type and victim behavior). Crime type and victim behavior affected participants blame attributions: the participants attributed least blame to the non-flirtatious sexual assault victim and most blame was attributed to the flirtatious sexual harassment victim. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nordic Psychology Taylor & Francis

Blame attributions in sexual crimes: Effects of belief in a just world and victim behavior

10 pages

Blame attributions in sexual crimes: Effects of belief in a just world and victim behavior

Abstract

Previous research has consistently shown that rape victims may be blamed for the assault but little is known about victim blaming in other sexual crimes. In the present experiment, we examined blame attributions for sexual assault and online sexual harassment. The study also investigated the effects of victim behavior, participants' belief in a just world, and participant gender on attributions of both victim and perpetrator blame. A vignette methodology was employed and a community...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 The Editors of Nordic Psychology
ISSN
1904-0016
eISSN
1901-2276
DOI
10.1080/19012276.2015.1026921
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research has consistently shown that rape victims may be blamed for the assault but little is known about victim blaming in other sexual crimes. In the present experiment, we examined blame attributions for sexual assault and online sexual harassment. The study also investigated the effects of victim behavior, participants' belief in a just world, and participant gender on attributions of both victim and perpetrator blame. A vignette methodology was employed and a community sample (N = 200) answered questions of victim and perpetrator blame after reading one of four different scenarios (which manipulated crime type and victim behavior). Crime type and victim behavior affected participants blame attributions: the participants attributed least blame to the non-flirtatious sexual assault victim and most blame was attributed to the flirtatious sexual harassment victim. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

Journal

Nordic PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2016

Keywords: victim blame; perpetrator blame; victim behavior; belief in a just word; secondary victimization

References