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Black Identity: Response to Our Reviewers

Black Identity: Response to Our Reviewers Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1996 1 2 1 1 Salomon Rettig, • Daniel Latendresse, and Michelle Smith First we wish to express our deeply felt gratitude to the reviewers of our study of the role of Black identity in the verdict of the 0. J. Simpson trial. Their reviews are presented not only in a most scholarly fashion, but are also most accurate. There are practically no significant differences be­ tween their views and ours on both the traditional perspective (the so called received view) in academic psychology, as well as the need for its corrective, especially when engaging in the experimental study of human behavior in the laboratory. The senior author has attempted to rigorously follow its precepts for more than 40 years and is still continuing to do so. However, in the study of Black Identity, we were confronted with a different issue, a potentially major social problem in interethnic communication and under­ standing. Hence my students and I tried a different, non-experimental mode of inquiry which seemed promising under the critical and highly sen­ sitive circumstances we were faced with. To clarify the origin of the present, so radically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

Black Identity: Response to Our Reviewers

Black Identity: Response to Our Reviewers

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1996 1 2 1 1 Salomon Rettig, • Daniel Latendresse, and Michelle Smith First we wish to express our deeply felt gratitude to the reviewers of our study of the role of Black identity in the verdict of the 0. J. Simpson trial. Their reviews are presented not only in a most scholarly fashion, but are also most accurate. There are practically no significant differences be­ tween their views and ours on both the traditional...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1996 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1007/BF02091657
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1996 1 2 1 1 Salomon Rettig, • Daniel Latendresse, and Michelle Smith First we wish to express our deeply felt gratitude to the reviewers of our study of the role of Black identity in the verdict of the 0. J. Simpson trial. Their reviews are presented not only in a most scholarly fashion, but are also most accurate. There are practically no significant differences be­ tween their views and ours on both the traditional perspective (the so called received view) in academic psychology, as well as the need for its corrective, especially when engaging in the experimental study of human behavior in the laboratory. The senior author has attempted to rigorously follow its precepts for more than 40 years and is still continuing to do so. However, in the study of Black Identity, we were confronted with a different issue, a potentially major social problem in interethnic communication and under­ standing. Hence my students and I tried a different, non-experimental mode of inquiry which seemed promising under the critical and highly sen­ sitive circumstances we were faced with. To clarify the origin of the present, so radically

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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