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Architecture at Sea: Shipping Containers, Capitalism and Imaginations of Space

Architecture at Sea: Shipping Containers, Capitalism and Imaginations of Space AbstractShipping containers, the seemingly simple tools of international trade, have given rise to a network of infrastructures that shape contemporary imaginations of global space. Centered around the shipping container’s ability to be aggregated and interchanged both as a physical object and as digital information, these infrastructures and imaginations give insight into how global capitalism regulates itself through the modulation of solids and flows. This paper builds on the author’s observations and discussions with crew members of the container ship, ZIM San Francisco during a forty-one day, trans-pacific voyage in order to draw conclusions about the social and spatial implications of the global trade networks built around the shipping container. Addressing these implications in both physical and abstract, architectural and environmental terms, this paper asks how addressing the shipping container as an object of critical analysis might serve as a model for reconceptualizing the relationship between architecture and global capitalism today. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Architecture at Sea: Shipping Containers, Capitalism and Imaginations of Space

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (2): 22 – May 4, 2017

Architecture at Sea: Shipping Containers, Capitalism and Imaginations of Space

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (2): 22 – May 4, 2017

Abstract

AbstractShipping containers, the seemingly simple tools of international trade, have given rise to a network of infrastructures that shape contemporary imaginations of global space. Centered around the shipping container’s ability to be aggregated and interchanged both as a physical object and as digital information, these infrastructures and imaginations give insight into how global capitalism regulates itself through the modulation of solids and flows. This paper builds on the author’s observations and discussions with crew members of the container ship, ZIM San Francisco during a forty-one day, trans-pacific voyage in order to draw conclusions about the social and spatial implications of the global trade networks built around the shipping container. Addressing these implications in both physical and abstract, architectural and environmental terms, this paper asks how addressing the shipping container as an object of critical analysis might serve as a model for reconceptualizing the relationship between architecture and global capitalism today.

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References (55)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2017.1325276
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractShipping containers, the seemingly simple tools of international trade, have given rise to a network of infrastructures that shape contemporary imaginations of global space. Centered around the shipping container’s ability to be aggregated and interchanged both as a physical object and as digital information, these infrastructures and imaginations give insight into how global capitalism regulates itself through the modulation of solids and flows. This paper builds on the author’s observations and discussions with crew members of the container ship, ZIM San Francisco during a forty-one day, trans-pacific voyage in order to draw conclusions about the social and spatial implications of the global trade networks built around the shipping container. Addressing these implications in both physical and abstract, architectural and environmental terms, this paper asks how addressing the shipping container as an object of critical analysis might serve as a model for reconceptualizing the relationship between architecture and global capitalism today.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2017

Keywords: shipping container; global trade; capitalism; space; infrastructure; technology; quantification; standards

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