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Architecture as Commodity, Architects as Cultural Intermediaries: A Case Study

Architecture as Commodity, Architects as Cultural Intermediaries: A Case Study AbstractThis paper examines the ways in which architectural authority and authorship were successfully commodified by an Australian homebuilder, Pettit & Sevitt, in the 1960s when the Royal Australian Institute of Architect’s Code of Professional Conduct still prohibited the advertising of an architect’s services. Drawing on the theories of Pierre Bourdieu and Paul du Gay, it argues that the independent architects who worked with Pettit & Sevitt assumed the role of “cultural intermediaries” within the company’s culture of production, facilitating the process of identification between product and target market while managing to avoid the issue of commercial “advertising.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Architecture as Commodity, Architects as Cultural Intermediaries: A Case Study

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (2): 20 – May 4, 2017

Architecture as Commodity, Architects as Cultural Intermediaries: A Case Study

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (2): 20 – May 4, 2017

Abstract

AbstractThis paper examines the ways in which architectural authority and authorship were successfully commodified by an Australian homebuilder, Pettit & Sevitt, in the 1960s when the Royal Australian Institute of Architect’s Code of Professional Conduct still prohibited the advertising of an architect’s services. Drawing on the theories of Pierre Bourdieu and Paul du Gay, it argues that the independent architects who worked with Pettit & Sevitt assumed the role of “cultural intermediaries” within the company’s culture of production, facilitating the process of identification between product and target market while managing to avoid the issue of commercial “advertising.”

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References (44)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2017.1325109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper examines the ways in which architectural authority and authorship were successfully commodified by an Australian homebuilder, Pettit & Sevitt, in the 1960s when the Royal Australian Institute of Architect’s Code of Professional Conduct still prohibited the advertising of an architect’s services. Drawing on the theories of Pierre Bourdieu and Paul du Gay, it argues that the independent architects who worked with Pettit & Sevitt assumed the role of “cultural intermediaries” within the company’s culture of production, facilitating the process of identification between product and target market while managing to avoid the issue of commercial “advertising.”

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2017

Keywords: commodification of architecture; culture of production; cultural intermediaries; project housing; Pettit & Sevitt

There are no references for this article.