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Architecture and the Interspecies Collective: Dog and Human Associates at Mars

Architecture and the Interspecies Collective: Dog and Human Associates at Mars Abstract Architecture typically overlooks the presence of animals and the role design plays in domestication. Domestication makes settled human societies possible through the shared burden of labor with animals. The farms, laboratories, “pet-friendly” offices and homes in which animals work are places where humans work too. This article explores one interspecies workplace: a pet-food research facility employing hundreds of dogs owned by the Mars company in Tennessee. The dogs are housed in circular buildings that depart from the linear arrangements of most kennels. In trying to understand this design strategy and the collaborative relationship between humans and dogs in the petfood laboratory, theories of animal labor are drawn from Vinciane Despret, Jocelyne Porcher, Donna Haraway and Isabelle Stengers. This architecture fosters the transformation of the individual and the formation of a specific mode of collective action, the pack. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Architecture and the Interspecies Collective: Dog and Human Associates at Mars

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (4): 18 – Oct 2, 2021

Architecture and the Interspecies Collective: Dog and Human Associates at Mars

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (4): 18 – Oct 2, 2021

Abstract

Abstract Architecture typically overlooks the presence of animals and the role design plays in domestication. Domestication makes settled human societies possible through the shared burden of labor with animals. The farms, laboratories, “pet-friendly” offices and homes in which animals work are places where humans work too. This article explores one interspecies workplace: a pet-food research facility employing hundreds of dogs owned by the Mars company in Tennessee. The dogs are housed in circular buildings that depart from the linear arrangements of most kennels. In trying to understand this design strategy and the collaborative relationship between humans and dogs in the petfood laboratory, theories of animal labor are drawn from Vinciane Despret, Jocelyne Porcher, Donna Haraway and Isabelle Stengers. This architecture fosters the transformation of the individual and the formation of a specific mode of collective action, the pack.

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References (34)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2020.1792108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Architecture typically overlooks the presence of animals and the role design plays in domestication. Domestication makes settled human societies possible through the shared burden of labor with animals. The farms, laboratories, “pet-friendly” offices and homes in which animals work are places where humans work too. This article explores one interspecies workplace: a pet-food research facility employing hundreds of dogs owned by the Mars company in Tennessee. The dogs are housed in circular buildings that depart from the linear arrangements of most kennels. In trying to understand this design strategy and the collaborative relationship between humans and dogs in the petfood laboratory, theories of animal labor are drawn from Vinciane Despret, Jocelyne Porcher, Donna Haraway and Isabelle Stengers. This architecture fosters the transformation of the individual and the formation of a specific mode of collective action, the pack.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2021

Keywords: Mars Pet Health and Nutrition Center; Waltham Petcare Science Institute; animal work; laboratory animals; parasol kennels

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