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Anti-Politics and the Corporations

Anti-Politics and the Corporations Does the free market bring about liberty? Are free markets the pacemakers for civil, democratic societies? When President Suharto of Indonesia resigned in May 1998, the response in the West was quiet satisfaction. A corrupt and murderous tyrant had been toppled and free markets with a little help from the International Monetary Fund could take the credit. But for decades the West had supported Suharto as part of the "crony capitalist" pact; violations of citizens' rights were overlooked so long as prof­ it margins stayed high. The civil disorder that forced Suharto out spread to Chinese minorities and led to persecutions of Catholics in East Timor. Indonesia began a slow and violent unraveling in In August, 1998 the Russian ruble went into a free fall deval­ uation, but this threat to the hegemony of the banking world's pen­ etrations into the decaying empire that was the former, mighty Soviet Union was quickly and firmly checked by the intervention of American banking authorities who stabilized a tottering govern­ ment.! There are numerous gaps between economic aspiration and reality. Despite the impassioned advocacy of former President Clinton about the benefits of deregulated global markets the facts are less sanguine. As an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

Anti-Politics and the Corporations

Journal of Social Distress and Homeless , Volume 12 (1-2): 30 – Jan 1, 2003
30 pages

Anti-Politics and the Corporations

Abstract

Does the free market bring about liberty? Are free markets the pacemakers for civil, democratic societies? When President Suharto of Indonesia resigned in May 1998, the response in the West was quiet satisfaction. A corrupt and murderous tyrant had been toppled and free markets with a little help from the International Monetary Fund could take the credit. But for decades the West had supported Suharto as part of the "crony capitalist" pact; violations of citizens' rights were...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 2003 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1080/10530789.2003.11739479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Does the free market bring about liberty? Are free markets the pacemakers for civil, democratic societies? When President Suharto of Indonesia resigned in May 1998, the response in the West was quiet satisfaction. A corrupt and murderous tyrant had been toppled and free markets with a little help from the International Monetary Fund could take the credit. But for decades the West had supported Suharto as part of the "crony capitalist" pact; violations of citizens' rights were overlooked so long as prof­ it margins stayed high. The civil disorder that forced Suharto out spread to Chinese minorities and led to persecutions of Catholics in East Timor. Indonesia began a slow and violent unraveling in In August, 1998 the Russian ruble went into a free fall deval­ uation, but this threat to the hegemony of the banking world's pen­ etrations into the decaying empire that was the former, mighty Soviet Union was quickly and firmly checked by the intervention of American banking authorities who stabilized a tottering govern­ ment.! There are numerous gaps between economic aspiration and reality. Despite the impassioned advocacy of former President Clinton about the benefits of deregulated global markets the facts are less sanguine. As an

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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