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An Efficient Method of Estimating Seemingly Unrelated Regressions and Tests for Aggregation Bias

An Efficient Method of Estimating Seemingly Unrelated Regressions and Tests for Aggregation Bias Abstract In this paper a method of estimating the parameters of a set of regression equations is reported which involves application of Aitken's generalized least-squares [1] to the whole system of equations. Under conditions generally encountered in practice, it is found that the regression coefficient estimators so obtained are at least asymptotically more efficient than those obtained by an equation-by-equation application of least squares. This gain in efficiency can be quite large if “independent” variables in different equations are not highly correlated and if disturbance terms in different equations are highly correlated. Further, tests of the hypothesis that all regression equation coefficient vectors are equal, based on “micro” and “macro” data, are described. If this hypothesis is accepted, there will be no aggregation bias. Finally, the estimation procedure and the “micro-test” for aggregation bias are applied in the analysis of annual investment data, 1935–1954, for two firms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Statistical Association Taylor & Francis

An Efficient Method of Estimating Seemingly Unrelated Regressions and Tests for Aggregation Bias

An Efficient Method of Estimating Seemingly Unrelated Regressions and Tests for Aggregation Bias

Journal of the American Statistical Association , Volume 57 (298): 21 – Jun 1, 1962

Abstract

Abstract In this paper a method of estimating the parameters of a set of regression equations is reported which involves application of Aitken's generalized least-squares [1] to the whole system of equations. Under conditions generally encountered in practice, it is found that the regression coefficient estimators so obtained are at least asymptotically more efficient than those obtained by an equation-by-equation application of least squares. This gain in efficiency can be quite large if “independent” variables in different equations are not highly correlated and if disturbance terms in different equations are highly correlated. Further, tests of the hypothesis that all regression equation coefficient vectors are equal, based on “micro” and “macro” data, are described. If this hypothesis is accepted, there will be no aggregation bias. Finally, the estimation procedure and the “micro-test” for aggregation bias are applied in the analysis of annual investment data, 1935–1954, for two firms.

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References (11)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1537-274X
eISSN
0162-1459
DOI
10.1080/01621459.1962.10480664
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In this paper a method of estimating the parameters of a set of regression equations is reported which involves application of Aitken's generalized least-squares [1] to the whole system of equations. Under conditions generally encountered in practice, it is found that the regression coefficient estimators so obtained are at least asymptotically more efficient than those obtained by an equation-by-equation application of least squares. This gain in efficiency can be quite large if “independent” variables in different equations are not highly correlated and if disturbance terms in different equations are highly correlated. Further, tests of the hypothesis that all regression equation coefficient vectors are equal, based on “micro” and “macro” data, are described. If this hypothesis is accepted, there will be no aggregation bias. Finally, the estimation procedure and the “micro-test” for aggregation bias are applied in the analysis of annual investment data, 1935–1954, for two firms.

Journal

Journal of the American Statistical AssociationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1962

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