Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’s commuter train network

An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’s commuter train network CONTEMPORARY JAPAN 145 An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’scommutertrain network, by Michael Fisch, Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, 2018, xii, 284 pp. + index, (Hardcover) ISBN 978-0-226-55841-7, DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226558691.001.0001. The power of Michael Fisch’s book lies in his willingness to follow his chosen approach until the end, resisting the temptations of simple narratives, explanations and conclu- sions; instead, Fisch offers an elaborated discussion of Tokyo’s commuter train network and concludes in a critical appeal to rethink (Japanese) post-war human–machine relations for the sake of a better future. The book informs, educates and argues, but it does not provide a final answer – which might be dissatisfactory for some readers, yet is perhaps the most honest way to stay true to the book’s principles and idea of the ‘margin of indeterminacy’ (xi). A book full of critique but free of nostalgia, and therefore not a ‘rage against the machine’, but an urge to find new ways of coexisting with technology. The above summary should satisfy all those who just want to know quickly if they should read this book (they should!). For those whose interest is piqued and wish to know more, however, a more detailed discussion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Japan Taylor & Francis

An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’s commuter train network

Contemporary Japan , Volume 32 (1): 3 – Jan 2, 2020

An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’s commuter train network

Contemporary Japan , Volume 32 (1): 3 – Jan 2, 2020

Abstract

CONTEMPORARY JAPAN 145 An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’scommutertrain network, by Michael Fisch, Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, 2018, xii, 284 pp. + index, (Hardcover) ISBN 978-0-226-55841-7, DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226558691.001.0001. The power of Michael Fisch’s book lies in his willingness to follow his chosen approach until the end, resisting the temptations of simple narratives, explanations and conclu- sions; instead, Fisch offers an elaborated discussion of Tokyo’s commuter train network and concludes in a critical appeal to rethink (Japanese) post-war human–machine relations for the sake of a better future. The book informs, educates and argues, but it does not provide a final answer – which might be dissatisfactory for some readers, yet is perhaps the most honest way to stay true to the book’s principles and idea of the ‘margin of indeterminacy’ (xi). A book full of critique but free of nostalgia, and therefore not a ‘rage against the machine’, but an urge to find new ways of coexisting with technology. The above summary should satisfy all those who just want to know quickly if they should read this book (they should!). For those whose interest is piqued and wish to know more, however, a more detailed discussion

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/an-anthropology-of-the-machine-tokyo-s-commuter-train-network-PauCVKYpUi

References (3)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Florian Purkarthofer
ISSN
1869-2737
eISSN
1869-2729
DOI
10.1080/18692729.2019.1603823
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CONTEMPORARY JAPAN 145 An anthropology of the machine: Tokyo’scommutertrain network, by Michael Fisch, Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, 2018, xii, 284 pp. + index, (Hardcover) ISBN 978-0-226-55841-7, DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226558691.001.0001. The power of Michael Fisch’s book lies in his willingness to follow his chosen approach until the end, resisting the temptations of simple narratives, explanations and conclu- sions; instead, Fisch offers an elaborated discussion of Tokyo’s commuter train network and concludes in a critical appeal to rethink (Japanese) post-war human–machine relations for the sake of a better future. The book informs, educates and argues, but it does not provide a final answer – which might be dissatisfactory for some readers, yet is perhaps the most honest way to stay true to the book’s principles and idea of the ‘margin of indeterminacy’ (xi). A book full of critique but free of nostalgia, and therefore not a ‘rage against the machine’, but an urge to find new ways of coexisting with technology. The above summary should satisfy all those who just want to know quickly if they should read this book (they should!). For those whose interest is piqued and wish to know more, however, a more detailed discussion

Journal

Contemporary JapanTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2020

There are no references for this article.