Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Allergic to the Twentieth Century: Intentional Communities and Therapeutic Landscapes in The Village and Safe

Allergic to the Twentieth Century: Intentional Communities and Therapeutic Landscapes in The... AbstractThe concept of therapeutic landscapes has been used to explore diverse spaces and places of healing or wellness, from hospitals to gardens, libraries to smoking areas. A central strand of this work considers rural and/or natural landscapes as affording particular healing experiences. In this paper, I draw on this lineage of work alongside research into the formation of intentional communities in rural settings and the body of writing on representations of rural landscapes and country life. The two representations I analyse are films: The Village (M. Night Shyamalan, 2004) and Safe (Todd Haynes, 1995). In the former, an apparent settler village in rural Pennsylvania is revealed, in the film’s denouement, as an intentional community built as a retreat from the violence of contemporary urban life, guarded by Elders and a shared mythology about border-policing creatures. In Safe, the health hazards of modern suburban living, which lead the central character to develop multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), can only be escaped by a similar retreat to a wilderness commune in the American desert. In both films, the spaces of rural life are constructed as therapeutic landscapes through their nostalgic, anti-modern withdrawal, and their protective boundary keeping. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Allergic to the Twentieth Century: Intentional Communities and Therapeutic Landscapes in The Village and Safe

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (1): 16 – Jan 2, 2017

Allergic to the Twentieth Century: Intentional Communities and Therapeutic Landscapes in The Village and Safe

Architecture and Culture , Volume 5 (1): 16 – Jan 2, 2017

Abstract

AbstractThe concept of therapeutic landscapes has been used to explore diverse spaces and places of healing or wellness, from hospitals to gardens, libraries to smoking areas. A central strand of this work considers rural and/or natural landscapes as affording particular healing experiences. In this paper, I draw on this lineage of work alongside research into the formation of intentional communities in rural settings and the body of writing on representations of rural landscapes and country life. The two representations I analyse are films: The Village (M. Night Shyamalan, 2004) and Safe (Todd Haynes, 1995). In the former, an apparent settler village in rural Pennsylvania is revealed, in the film’s denouement, as an intentional community built as a retreat from the violence of contemporary urban life, guarded by Elders and a shared mythology about border-policing creatures. In Safe, the health hazards of modern suburban living, which lead the central character to develop multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), can only be escaped by a similar retreat to a wilderness commune in the American desert. In both films, the spaces of rural life are constructed as therapeutic landscapes through their nostalgic, anti-modern withdrawal, and their protective boundary keeping.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/allergic-to-the-twentieth-century-intentional-communities-and-05vlod47py

References (45)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2017.1283123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe concept of therapeutic landscapes has been used to explore diverse spaces and places of healing or wellness, from hospitals to gardens, libraries to smoking areas. A central strand of this work considers rural and/or natural landscapes as affording particular healing experiences. In this paper, I draw on this lineage of work alongside research into the formation of intentional communities in rural settings and the body of writing on representations of rural landscapes and country life. The two representations I analyse are films: The Village (M. Night Shyamalan, 2004) and Safe (Todd Haynes, 1995). In the former, an apparent settler village in rural Pennsylvania is revealed, in the film’s denouement, as an intentional community built as a retreat from the violence of contemporary urban life, guarded by Elders and a shared mythology about border-policing creatures. In Safe, the health hazards of modern suburban living, which lead the central character to develop multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), can only be escaped by a similar retreat to a wilderness commune in the American desert. In both films, the spaces of rural life are constructed as therapeutic landscapes through their nostalgic, anti-modern withdrawal, and their protective boundary keeping.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2017

Keywords: therapeutic landscape; intentional community; Safe; The Village; rural life; rural representation

There are no references for this article.