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Affective brain-computer interfaces: Special Issue editorial

Affective brain-computer interfaces: Special Issue editorial Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 Vol. 1, No. 2, 63–65, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2014.913829 Editorial Introduction s/he is already annoyed or confused, whereas an aBCI could automatically initiate changes that help the user Over the last several years, brain-computer interface focus on accomplishing goals. (BCI) research has grown well beyond initial efforts to Tools to monitor drowsiness based on the EEG or provide basic communication for people with severe dis- other means have been explored for many decades, but abilities that prevent them from communicating other- recent work has made such systems far more practical. wise. Since BCIs rely on direct measures of brain For example, a driver might wear a headband that activity, users do not have to move in any way to con- detects alertness from the EEG. If the driver begins to vey information.[1] During the early years of BCI fall asleep, a cell phone might sound an alarm or initiate research, BCI systems had little to offer healthy users. other actions. This approach might be useful for other Since most users can communicate quickly and easily by people in attention-critical situations such as pilots, secu- speaking or typing, why would healthy people use a rity guards or nuclear plant operators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Affective brain-computer interfaces: Special Issue editorial

Affective brain-computer interfaces: Special Issue editorial

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 1 (2): 3 – Apr 3, 2014

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 Vol. 1, No. 2, 63–65, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2014.913829 Editorial Introduction s/he is already annoyed or confused, whereas an aBCI could automatically initiate changes that help the user Over the last several years, brain-computer interface focus on accomplishing goals. (BCI) research has grown well beyond initial efforts to Tools to monitor drowsiness based on the EEG or provide basic communication for people with severe dis- other means have been explored for many decades, but abilities that prevent them from communicating other- recent work has made such systems far more practical. wise. Since BCIs rely on direct measures of brain For example, a driver might wear a headband that activity, users do not have to move in any way to con- detects alertness from the EEG. If the driver begins to vey information.[1] During the early years of BCI fall asleep, a cell phone might sound an alarm or initiate research, BCI systems had little to offer healthy users. other actions. This approach might be useful for other Since most users can communicate quickly and easily by people in attention-critical situations such as pilots, secu- speaking or typing, why would healthy people use a rity guards or nuclear plant operators.

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References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2014.913829
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 Vol. 1, No. 2, 63–65, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2014.913829 Editorial Introduction s/he is already annoyed or confused, whereas an aBCI could automatically initiate changes that help the user Over the last several years, brain-computer interface focus on accomplishing goals. (BCI) research has grown well beyond initial efforts to Tools to monitor drowsiness based on the EEG or provide basic communication for people with severe dis- other means have been explored for many decades, but abilities that prevent them from communicating other- recent work has made such systems far more practical. wise. Since BCIs rely on direct measures of brain For example, a driver might wear a headband that activity, users do not have to move in any way to con- detects alertness from the EEG. If the driver begins to vey information.[1] During the early years of BCI fall asleep, a cell phone might sound an alarm or initiate research, BCI systems had little to offer healthy users. other actions. This approach might be useful for other Since most users can communicate quickly and easily by people in attention-critical situations such as pilots, secu- speaking or typing, why would healthy people use a rity guards or nuclear plant operators.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2014

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