Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Acroshaw: Forgotten, but not Forgiven

Acroshaw: Forgotten, but not Forgiven AbstractBetween the Standard Catalogue Company selling AD and Andreas Papadakis’s Academy Editions buying it in 1977, the magazine was owned for a year by an off-the-shelf company called Acroshaw, set up by the editors Martin Spring and Haig Beck. This precarious year, when AD was perilously close to closing down, is forgotten in history, but was definitive in turning the previous champion of neo-avant-garde movements such as Brutalism, Cedric Price and Archigram into the mouthpiece of Charles Jencks and Post-Modernism. Through oral history, biography and previously unseen notes taken by Spring at the time, this article recounts this fateful year in detail. It describes the struggles between the uncomfortable ménage à trois of Spring, Beck and Papadakis, demonstrating how an acute business acumen prevailed over architectural idealism in the battle to define architecture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Acroshaw: Forgotten, but not Forgiven

Architecture and Culture , Volume 6 (1): 23 – Jan 2, 2018

Acroshaw: Forgotten, but not Forgiven

Architecture and Culture , Volume 6 (1): 23 – Jan 2, 2018

Abstract

AbstractBetween the Standard Catalogue Company selling AD and Andreas Papadakis’s Academy Editions buying it in 1977, the magazine was owned for a year by an off-the-shelf company called Acroshaw, set up by the editors Martin Spring and Haig Beck. This precarious year, when AD was perilously close to closing down, is forgotten in history, but was definitive in turning the previous champion of neo-avant-garde movements such as Brutalism, Cedric Price and Archigram into the mouthpiece of Charles Jencks and Post-Modernism. Through oral history, biography and previously unseen notes taken by Spring at the time, this article recounts this fateful year in detail. It describes the struggles between the uncomfortable ménage à trois of Spring, Beck and Papadakis, demonstrating how an acute business acumen prevailed over architectural idealism in the battle to define architecture.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/acroshaw-forgotten-but-not-forgiven-8atA12W1hL

References (4)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2017.1386455
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBetween the Standard Catalogue Company selling AD and Andreas Papadakis’s Academy Editions buying it in 1977, the magazine was owned for a year by an off-the-shelf company called Acroshaw, set up by the editors Martin Spring and Haig Beck. This precarious year, when AD was perilously close to closing down, is forgotten in history, but was definitive in turning the previous champion of neo-avant-garde movements such as Brutalism, Cedric Price and Archigram into the mouthpiece of Charles Jencks and Post-Modernism. Through oral history, biography and previously unseen notes taken by Spring at the time, this article recounts this fateful year in detail. It describes the struggles between the uncomfortable ménage à trois of Spring, Beck and Papadakis, demonstrating how an acute business acumen prevailed over architectural idealism in the battle to define architecture.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2018

Keywords: AD; Architectural Design; architectural magazine; architectural historiography; Post-Modernism

There are no references for this article.