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A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism

A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism A WORLD CULTURE VIEW OF TERRORISM A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism During the Persian Gulf War in 1991, the Iraqis sent Scud missiles into civilian, residential neighborhoods of Israel and Saudi Arabia. The Allies denounced these attacks as terrorism, the use of warlike tactics and weapons against non-military populations. Violent terrorist acts - kidnapping, torture, bombings - are often committed by a state or by a political movement to call attention to a cause, to crush a liberation struggle, or to shake people's faith in the ability of government to eliminate a threat. A terrorist move­ ment may be revolutionary seeking far-reaching changes in the government or it may seek to gain control over the state. But not all terrorism is revolutionary: the violence of the cocaine barons in Colombia (known as narco - terrorism) is designed to take revenge on the authorities and to intimidate them into lax enforcement of the law. The terrorism of governments (like those of the former Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China or the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia) against their own people is a form of repression not associated with revolutionary movements. In recent decades, terrorism has become http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism

Journal of Social Distress and Homeless , Volume 12 (1-2): 30 – Jan 1, 2003
30 pages

A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism

Abstract

A WORLD CULTURE VIEW OF TERRORISM A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism During the Persian Gulf War in 1991, the Iraqis sent Scud missiles into civilian, residential neighborhoods of Israel and Saudi Arabia. The Allies denounced these attacks as terrorism, the use of warlike tactics and weapons against non-military populations. Violent terrorist acts - kidnapping, torture, bombings - are often committed by a state or by a political movement to call attention to a cause,...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 2003 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1080/10530789.2003.11739481
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A WORLD CULTURE VIEW OF TERRORISM A World Culture View of Domestic and International Terrorism During the Persian Gulf War in 1991, the Iraqis sent Scud missiles into civilian, residential neighborhoods of Israel and Saudi Arabia. The Allies denounced these attacks as terrorism, the use of warlike tactics and weapons against non-military populations. Violent terrorist acts - kidnapping, torture, bombings - are often committed by a state or by a political movement to call attention to a cause, to crush a liberation struggle, or to shake people's faith in the ability of government to eliminate a threat. A terrorist move­ ment may be revolutionary seeking far-reaching changes in the government or it may seek to gain control over the state. But not all terrorism is revolutionary: the violence of the cocaine barons in Colombia (known as narco - terrorism) is designed to take revenge on the authorities and to intimidate them into lax enforcement of the law. The terrorism of governments (like those of the former Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China or the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia) against their own people is a form of repression not associated with revolutionary movements. In recent decades, terrorism has become

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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