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A survey of affective brain computer interfaces: principles, state-of-the-art, and challenges

A survey of affective brain computer interfaces: principles, state-of-the-art, and challenges Affective states, moods and emotions, are an integral part of human nature: they shape our thoughts, govern the behavior of the individual, and influence our interpersonal relationships. The last decades have seen a growing interest in the automatic detection of such states from voice, facial expression, and physiological signals, primarily with the goal of enhancing human-computer interaction with an affective component. With the advent of brain-computer interface research, the idea of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI), enabling affect detection from brain signals, arose. In this article, we set out to survey the field of neurophysiology-based affect detection. We outline possible applications of aBCI in a general taxonomy of brain-computer interface approaches and introduce the core concepts of affect and their neurophysiological fundamentals. We show that there is a growing body of literature that evidences the capabilities, but also the limitations and challenges of affect detection from neurophysiological activity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

A survey of affective brain computer interfaces: principles, state-of-the-art, and challenges

A survey of affective brain computer interfaces: principles, state-of-the-art, and challenges

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 1 (2): 19 – Apr 3, 2014

Abstract

Affective states, moods and emotions, are an integral part of human nature: they shape our thoughts, govern the behavior of the individual, and influence our interpersonal relationships. The last decades have seen a growing interest in the automatic detection of such states from voice, facial expression, and physiological signals, primarily with the goal of enhancing human-computer interaction with an affective component. With the advent of brain-computer interface research, the idea of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI), enabling affect detection from brain signals, arose. In this article, we set out to survey the field of neurophysiology-based affect detection. We outline possible applications of aBCI in a general taxonomy of brain-computer interface approaches and introduce the core concepts of affect and their neurophysiological fundamentals. We show that there is a growing body of literature that evidences the capabilities, but also the limitations and challenges of affect detection from neurophysiological activity.

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References (143)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2014.912881
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Affective states, moods and emotions, are an integral part of human nature: they shape our thoughts, govern the behavior of the individual, and influence our interpersonal relationships. The last decades have seen a growing interest in the automatic detection of such states from voice, facial expression, and physiological signals, primarily with the goal of enhancing human-computer interaction with an affective component. With the advent of brain-computer interface research, the idea of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI), enabling affect detection from brain signals, arose. In this article, we set out to survey the field of neurophysiology-based affect detection. We outline possible applications of aBCI in a general taxonomy of brain-computer interface approaches and introduce the core concepts of affect and their neurophysiological fundamentals. We show that there is a growing body of literature that evidences the capabilities, but also the limitations and challenges of affect detection from neurophysiological activity.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2014

Keywords: brain computer interfaces; affect; emotions; moods; EEG; fNIRS

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