Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A new measure of housing affordability: Estimates and analytical results

A new measure of housing affordability: Estimates and analytical results Abstract Affordable housing has often been described in terms of rent burden or owner cost burden. This article introduces the concept of housing‐induced poverty to describe the situation that arises when a household, after paying for housing, cannot afford the poverty basket of nonhousing goods. This is similar to Stone's shelter poverty concept, except that it is linked to a better‐known measure—the official poverty thresholds. On the basis of the 1999 American Housing Survey, it is estimated that 3.8 million households that were above the official thresholds could not afford the poverty basket of nonhousing goods. In 1999, the housing‐induced poverty rate in the United States was 2.7 percentage points higher than the official rate. Results from an analytical model reveal that regional and locational variables are significant determinants of the probability of housing‐induced poverty. Housing assistance significantly decreases the probability that near‐poor renters will fall into housing‐induced poverty. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Housing Policy Debate Taylor & Francis

A new measure of housing affordability: Estimates and analytical results

Housing Policy Debate , Volume 16 (1): 30 – Jan 1, 2005
30 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/a-new-measure-of-housing-affordability-estimates-and-analytical-3Fmrn4d5gY

References (29)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2152-050X
eISSN
1051-1482
DOI
10.1080/10511482.2005.9521536
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Affordable housing has often been described in terms of rent burden or owner cost burden. This article introduces the concept of housing‐induced poverty to describe the situation that arises when a household, after paying for housing, cannot afford the poverty basket of nonhousing goods. This is similar to Stone's shelter poverty concept, except that it is linked to a better‐known measure—the official poverty thresholds. On the basis of the 1999 American Housing Survey, it is estimated that 3.8 million households that were above the official thresholds could not afford the poverty basket of nonhousing goods. In 1999, the housing‐induced poverty rate in the United States was 2.7 percentage points higher than the official rate. Results from an analytical model reveal that regional and locational variables are significant determinants of the probability of housing‐induced poverty. Housing assistance significantly decreases the probability that near‐poor renters will fall into housing‐induced poverty.

Journal

Housing Policy DebateTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Affordability; Demographics; Poverty

There are no references for this article.