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A Multivariate Study of Pursuit Rotor Skill Development

A Multivariate Study of Pursuit Rotor Skill Development SWGBL RBSBARCH QUARTBRLY RBSBARCH NOTE FOR ExBRCISB AND SPORT 1990, VOL. 61, No.2, pp. 201-205 DONALD SIEGEL Smith College Key words: skill acquisition, skill processes, pursuit rotor derived, such as (a) variability in the number of HITS across trials, (b) mean duration of HITS, (c) variability of the dura­ Essential to an understanding of motor learning are meas­ tion of contactswithin a trial,and (d) mean durationof misses. ures and methodologies that allow researchers to examine Unfortunately, Ammons(1951), using this approach with the undedyingprocessesoccurringduringperformance. Although technologyavailableat the time, notedthat data collectionand typical global indices such as batting average and shooting analysis was labor intensive,requiring between 12and 15 hrs percentage may reflect an individual's overall attainment to reduce the records of one subject! Henceforth, it is under­ level, they alone do little to help our understanding of the standable why multivariate studies of pursuit rotor perform­ processes mediating skill acquisition and performance. As ance did not become fashionable. eloquently conveyed by Bahrick, Fitts, and Briggs (1957) Similar observations were made by Bourne and Archer over thirty years ago, different performancescores associated (1956), who also noted limitations in the measurement of with the samephenomenoncan result in verydifferentconclu­ performancesolelyas TOT. Consequently,they developedan sions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport Taylor & Francis

A Multivariate Study of Pursuit Rotor Skill Development

Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport , Volume 61 (2): 5 – Jun 1, 1990

A Multivariate Study of Pursuit Rotor Skill Development

Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport , Volume 61 (2): 5 – Jun 1, 1990

Abstract

SWGBL RBSBARCH QUARTBRLY RBSBARCH NOTE FOR ExBRCISB AND SPORT 1990, VOL. 61, No.2, pp. 201-205 DONALD SIEGEL Smith College Key words: skill acquisition, skill processes, pursuit rotor derived, such as (a) variability in the number of HITS across trials, (b) mean duration of HITS, (c) variability of the dura­ Essential to an understanding of motor learning are meas­ tion of contactswithin a trial,and (d) mean durationof misses. ures and methodologies that allow researchers to examine Unfortunately, Ammons(1951), using this approach with the undedyingprocessesoccurringduringperformance. Although technologyavailableat the time, notedthat data collectionand typical global indices such as batting average and shooting analysis was labor intensive,requiring between 12and 15 hrs percentage may reflect an individual's overall attainment to reduce the records of one subject! Henceforth, it is under­ level, they alone do little to help our understanding of the standable why multivariate studies of pursuit rotor perform­ processes mediating skill acquisition and performance. As ance did not become fashionable. eloquently conveyed by Bahrick, Fitts, and Briggs (1957) Similar observations were made by Bourne and Archer over thirty years ago, different performancescores associated (1956), who also noted limitations in the measurement of with the samephenomenoncan result in verydifferentconclu­ performancesolelyas TOT. Consequently,they developedan sions

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References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2168-3824
eISSN
0270-1367
DOI
10.1080/02701367.1990.10608676
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SWGBL RBSBARCH QUARTBRLY RBSBARCH NOTE FOR ExBRCISB AND SPORT 1990, VOL. 61, No.2, pp. 201-205 DONALD SIEGEL Smith College Key words: skill acquisition, skill processes, pursuit rotor derived, such as (a) variability in the number of HITS across trials, (b) mean duration of HITS, (c) variability of the dura­ Essential to an understanding of motor learning are meas­ tion of contactswithin a trial,and (d) mean durationof misses. ures and methodologies that allow researchers to examine Unfortunately, Ammons(1951), using this approach with the undedyingprocessesoccurringduringperformance. Although technologyavailableat the time, notedthat data collectionand typical global indices such as batting average and shooting analysis was labor intensive,requiring between 12and 15 hrs percentage may reflect an individual's overall attainment to reduce the records of one subject! Henceforth, it is under­ level, they alone do little to help our understanding of the standable why multivariate studies of pursuit rotor perform­ processes mediating skill acquisition and performance. As ance did not become fashionable. eloquently conveyed by Bahrick, Fitts, and Briggs (1957) Similar observations were made by Bourne and Archer over thirty years ago, different performancescores associated (1956), who also noted limitations in the measurement of with the samephenomenoncan result in verydifferentconclu­ performancesolelyas TOT. Consequently,they developedan sions

Journal

Research Quarterly for Exercise & SportTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1990

Keywords: skill acquisition; skill processes; pursuit rotor

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